Writing and Networking

agreement arms business business agreement

When it comes to writing, there are many skills that a writer needs to learn. Yet, nothing is more important than networking. This vital skill, especially in our interconnected digital age, is critical for a writer’s success.

What is networking? How can a writer apply it correctly? This article will discuss these questions—so if you’re a writer, feel free to examine this article at length.

—Networking as a Writer—

Networking is when you engage with another individual, whether online or in-person, to discuss a topic of interest. The conversation builds reputation and camaraderie between you two. Networking shares information about what you are and your goals.

Why Should a Writer Network?

I cannot understate the importance of networking for writers, particularly freelance authors. Without a proper network, a writer cannot establish a fanbase or rally social support for his or her WIP.

Imagine you’re a merchant trying to garner attention for your wares in a busy street—all by yourself. Your voice will be a lot louder when you have hundreds or thousands of supporters screaming with you.

What Are the Benefits?

When you network, the other person gains a better understanding of who you are or what you represent. This technique can be beneficial for job hunting, selling a brand, or promoting awareness about a book or WIP.

Tips for Networking

Here are some general tips for engaging with others; they can be applied for promoting your brand, be it a novel, poem, or collection of works. I’ve reformatted them to apply for writers below.

  1. Be Brave—Contacting strangers isn’t always easy. Mustering that courage and initiating the conversation is the first step. Remember you have nothing to lose, and a lot to gain from their feedback of you’re WIP.
  2. Understand Your Audience—Once you’ve introduced yourself, get to know the other person. Break the ice and establish an air of friendship.
  3. Be Yourself—Don’t be a robot or a greedy opportunist. The more human you appear, the higher the chance the other person will respect and help you.
  4. Stay Positive—No one likes a whiner. All writers are insecure on some level, but, learning to channel that uncertainty into something productive works miracles.
  5. Remain In Touch—Don’t lose that hard-won fan! Get some contact information to follow up with the person later.
  6. Accept What Doesn’t Work—Not every contact will be helpful or worthwhile. Use those contacts to polish your networking ability and take what feedback you find helpful.
  7. Social Media—As a powerful networking tool, social media can do things that in-person networking cannot. Utilize sites like Facebook, Twitter, WordPress, Instagram, or independent sites like Critique Circle. Comment on another person’s blog, writing, or post. Who knows; you might become buddies.

—Personal Websites for Networking—

A solid list of contacts is handy, but proving your skills to your fanbase through an online medium like a blog is even better. This will encourage your audience objectively and give them ammo to pitch to others who might be interested. Your contacts will be practically growing themselves!

A Personal Website

Your own domain and website are essential for several reasons:

  1. A website, especially one with your own domain, shows your contacts that you are serious about your project.
  2. It provides a convenient portfolio that they can view.
  3. Websites often have social media compatibility, excellent for sharing.
  4. Blogging sites (like this one) allow your audience to give comments and feedback as needed.
  5. It organizes your WIP.

SEO and Domains

SEO is also crucial for a website. Check out my older article for tips on that. Purchase your own domain from sites like WordPress or GoDaddy—a good rate for a basic domain is around $2-3 a month. This’ll make a difference, trust me.

athlete ball blurred background close up

A Strong Pitch

When networking, your audience will ask what your WIP is about. You should be prepared, answering in a confident and strong voice. This is called a pitch, or a concise synopsis of your WIP.

Many refer to this as the 60-second pitch.

“60-second pitch – sometimes known as the telephone pitch, or the elevator pitch, or the pitch fest pitch. Because it’s a pitch, you have less than two minutes to deliver.”

How Do You Deliver a Good Pitch?

Here’s a breakdown:

  1. First sentence: Give an original and easy to understand summary of the story in a short sentence. Make it interesting while evoking strong emotion. Mention the word count too.
  2. Second and third sentences: Explain what, who, when, and how. This discusses the main characters and the conflict—the goals of the book.
  3. Final sentence: Summarize how the story or journey progresses to the end. Wrap things up smoothly.

Practice, Practice, Practice

The best way to master your pitch is to rehearse it. First, begin by writing your three or four sentences down on paper. Use it as an aid initially in front of friends and family until you’ve memorized your 60-second pitch.

Eventually, it should become second-nature. Keep refining it, using your voice to highlight important emotions or details. This will catch peoples’ eye.

photo of three labeled mockup business cards

Business Cards

Having a business card isn’t a bad idea. Include your contact information on it, notably your website or blog. Design a nifty, unique logo that represents your brand or WIP.

You can produce business cards in bulk for relatively cheap at a store like Staples. A buddy of mine said he made 500 cards for around $20. There are also countless other business card designer websites you can use.

And here’s a tutorial on design in Illustrator for your own business card.  Here’s one for GIMP, a free digital art program.

—In Conclusion—

Some writers might be introverts who prefer the seclusion of their craft. However, to gain a sizable audience, one must first interact with potential readers and sell a book, pushing through all the fears and doubts. Having a strong pitch is an asset and will garner the attention of agents and publishers.

I hope this article has provided a solid introduction to networking for writers. For more information, visit the links below. Thanks for reading!


Additional Sources

http://graemeshimmin.com/creating-an-irresistible-elevator-pitch/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/cutting-edge-leadership/201403/networking-101-how-social-network-effectively

https://www.tomiadeyemi.com/blog/how-to-pitch-a-literary-agent-in-5-easy-steps

https://www.thebalancecareers.com/elevator-speech-examples-and-writing-tips-2061976

https://www.vistaprint.com/business-cards/standard

https://www.tckpublishing.com/creative-business-card-ideas-for-writers/


A reminder: My Published Poetry!!!

My published poetry is now available! You can view and order the collected works here. Look for New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019: An Anthology. My pen name is Ed White. The book is a collection of poems from like-minded authors, compiled into a beautiful collection. Many of the poems are quite impressive.

You can view and buy other books from ZPublishing too. Any purchases made through the above link benefit this blog. Thanks a lot. 🙂

 

My post got deleted!

So yeah, I was about to publish a 1,000-word article on my blog here. I was fiddling with some inserted images to get them just right. Suddenly, WordPress decides to delete it. When I try to recover it in revisions, there aren’t any listed! I tried checking Google caches and using a nifty web tool called Wayback Machine. No luck.

I understand glitches can happen, WordPress, but it still burns my coffee after spending hours on my article. I’m just venting to my readers, of course. Literary expression of ire is a fine way to feel better.

That said, my—now dead—article was on constructive criticism tips for writers. I discussed some nifty advice that put things into perspective. I’m too lazy and busy to rewrite it though. I’ll post some articles below that covered the gist of it.

I’m sorry, to any of my readers, but shit like this happens sometimes. What can we do but push forward? Whew! I feel better now.

Thank you for reading my little rant. 🙂

Suggested websites for criticism

https://personalexcellence.co/blog/constructive-criticism/

https://www.themuse.com/advice/taking-constructive-criticism-like-a-champ

https://oregonstate.edu/instruct/comm440-540/criticism.htm

https://www.reference.com/art-literature/examples-constructive-criticism-95c378240583c2fc

https://www.writerscookbook.com/giving-and-receiving-constructive-criticism/

https://www.thebalancecareers.com/tips-for-an-effective-creative-writing-critique-1277065

https://www.pcwrede.com/getting-good-critique/

 

 

 

 

 

A Big WordPress Thank You—50 Follows!

download

It seems I hit another milestone: 50 follows! I wanted to take the time to thank all of you wonderful people for reading my humble blog. I may not be the best writer or blogger, but it brings a smile to my face to see others delighted by my work.

That said, I also noticed my WordPress yearly subscription just renewed as I hit 50 follows. This is an excellent opportunity to recap on the year’s progress. Doing so may give insight on where this blog heads for the future—and beyond.

—WordPress Beginnings—

How I Started with WordPress

I was halfway through my alpha manuscript for Ethereal Seals when I read good things about blogging—WordPress in particular. Many writers took up blogging, not just for building followers, but also for the sake of the craft. I find it a relaxing pastime, one that brings notice to my writing project—the chance to meet wonderful people like you.

My First Year on WordPress

Not much happened with the first few years I began WordPress in 2016 and 2017. At this time, my webpage was an unpaid subscription. I focused on designing the basic framework for my webpage and connecting it to social media. I rarely posted, mostly using the page as an archive to brainstorm and test ideas rather than a blog.

—A Rough Journey—

Enter 2018

The current year, 2018, is when I posted more routinely on my blog. I had fleshed out the skeleton for Ethereal Seals and wanted to spread word about it—early.

Unfortunately, it was rare for me to get more than a few views each week. The road was rough and depressing. Some weeks I was too busy to blog, or I felt unmotivated. Many times I felt like throwing in the towel—and still do sometimes. The feedback I get from readers helps me push forward.

I kept blogging, regardless of my dismal results. With every post, my blogging skills improved. I explored WordPress more, discovering new ways to present my site. I read other bloggers’ pages and networked. Soon, I had a small niche of blogger buddies that I spoke with often.

Leveling Up

Early in 2018, my website had leveled up to a Personal WordPress page. I wanted my own domain for a reasonable cost. I also read that having a domain is like owning your own brand—it shows the world you’re serious about blogging and writing.

Months later, I found a job as a freelance writer. The occupation involved writing articles in a particular format. Some of you may have noticed that my presentation of articles has changed—for improved readability and organization. I’m still experimenting with it.

—A Nice Conclusion to the Year—

A Pleasant Surprise

Towards the end of 2018, I was between jobs, relying on my freelance writing to keep me afloat. I also found a local writers’ group in my village, a place for feedback and networking purposes. So far, I have enjoyed it, and the people there are helpful.

Meanwhile, I noticed my follower count improving on WordPress. I expected to get only 10 to 15 followers by year’s end. With your generous help, I’ve more than quadrupled my goal. Although I still have a long way to go, this is more than I could ever hope for. Thank you.

Looking Forward

I’m happy with the way this blog has turned out—its overall progression. My intent for the first couple of years was a casual blog without a lot of hassle.

I intend to improve my blogging skills and expand my outreach. This will—hopefully—garner more support for my writing project. I’m always looking for beta readers and helpers. If you’re interested, let me know.

Thank you all once again for your support, my little niche of readers. Without you, I may have given up long ago. Comments and even liked articles motivate me to blog and work on Ethereal Seals.

Final Remarks

With that said, I know the writer’s journey is arduous for anyone. I will remain patient and steadfast to my goals. My manuscript has improved significantly—and continues to with every editing pass.

As 2018 draws to a close, my objectives for 2019 are to save up enough money for an editor, find an agent, and begin the publishing process for Ethereal Seals book one. I intend to remain a blogger and attendee to the writers’ group. If things pan out, my book—or ebook if I self-publish—will be available by late 2019.

Thank you again for reading. Have a wonderful Christmas, New Years, Winter Solstice, or whatever it is you celebrate! Cheers. 😀


Hit that follow button if you want to stay connected. Love and gratitude.