Book Review: Stalking the Wild Asparagus—and Herbology in Ethereal Seals

A week ago I finished a nonfiction book on foraging. It was a very enjoyable read, as it played into one of my biggest hobbies. It also had me thinking about the herbology in my fantasy novel, Blade of Dragons. I’ll provide a rundown of Stalking the Wild Asparagus, then tie in concepts to my own world building.

Premise

The book is organized like a reference manual. Each chapter describes a specific herb or plant, the lore behind it, how to harvest and process it, and so on. There were several foods, like cattails, which I never realized could be ground for flour.

The author also takes time to describe personal stories associated with each herb and how he went about acquiring it. I found it entertaining and educational.

Prose

The chapters are fairly short and straightforward. The author does a good job conveying information, but some of the terms are outdated. The book was published sixty years ago, so it’s not too surprising. A new reader might get initially confused at this.

Information

As mentioned above, there are useful bits of information in the book. Each chapter has its own lesson: “do’s” and “don’t’s” when handling wild plants. It still fascinates me that one can walk along a trail and gather a whole bag-full of edible greens and herbs.

The author covered everything from wild crab apples, to purslane, watercress, even fishing bluegill from local ponds. Free food, many of which are taken for granted.

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The Good

Stalking the Wild Asparagus is a handy field guide for foragers and the curious. Considering the times we are in, having access to one of these books may not be a bad idea.

The Bad

Some of the terms and methods explained in the book are outdated and may not apply to the modern reader.

The Ugly

The author is slightly condescending towards races of color and labels he gives. This may create uncomfortable moments for the reader.

Stalking the Wild Asparagus is an effective tool for foragers, preppers, and wild foodists. The outdated jargon aside, a reader will get a lot of use out of this book.

After finishing Stalking the Wild Asparagus, it had me thinking about my fantasy novel and the herbs that Atlas uses. Who says nonfiction can’t influence a creative writer? Exploring culinary and medicinal foods in one’s setting is a fun way to world build too!

Atlasian Herbs

  • Berryshroom: A sweet tasting fungus that enhances the immune system; it is a common side dish in Atläsian cuisine. Berryshroom is often found in dark places, like caverns and bogs.
  • Bitterwort: A vinegary herb used in many medicinal tinctures. When over boiled, it becomes hallucinogenic. Bitterwort is the staple for many medicines across Atlas, although it must be handled carefully with its caustic nature.
  • Frostleaf: A minty and soothing herb with a mildly sweet taste; it is often used for sweetening drinks. This herb grows in very cold regions and is a delightful sight for any adventurer braving the cold.
  • Grassfoot: An herb with a mildly sweet taste; used for garnishes and sweetening tinctures. Unlike its cousin, frostleaf, the grassfoot variety grows on lush meadows
  • Gospelberry: An herb with a potent and sweet aroma; it is unsuitable for eating, but excellent for perfumes. However, if overboiled, gospelberry can make a fine tea. Interestingly, gospelberry often grows near holy sights on Atlas. This earn the berry its name.
  • Ravenberry: A berry with a pungent and sour taste; when fermented, it turns sweet and sour, ideal for alcohol cocktails. Ravenberry’s black hue and indelible dye are its signature features.
  • Savormoss: An edible lichen prized for its nutrition and delicious, pungent flavor—if you can stand the sour aroma. Savormoss grows everywhere and its prized for its abundance.

Preparation in Ethereal Seals

I drew from alchemical methods in Earth’s history when devising herbal preparations. Many Atlasian herbalists use cooking or fermentation to process these herbs. Teas, tinctures, and broths are all common. Some herbs, like gospelberry and bitterwort, can take longer to process. Others, like savormoss, can be eaten raw.

That said, the above list of Atlasian herbs will likely expand into the second and third book. It has certainly added depth to the story, and it plays a little into the protagonist’s arc. I have books like Stalking the Wild Asparagus to thank for my inspiration.


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Book Review: Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet

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Greetings, my readers. I decided to switch things up a bit and review a nonfiction novel. This installation is Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet by Jess Stearn. It’s a fascinating read and covers a variety of information that should appeal to a broad audience. Anyway, on with the show!

—Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet—

Premise

Edgar Cayce was an unnatural man, the book claimed, with his ability to enter a trance and procure insightful information. Upon waking, Cayce wouldn’t remember any of it, but listeners would jot down his words.

Many sick people were cured after following Cayce’s directions—and he often supplied complex or unusual ingredients for each cure. Cayce’s work also mentioned reincarnation and theories of Atlantis, delving deep into conspiracy theory and spiritual suggestion.

Prose

Unfortunately, the writing fluctuated between exciting and dull. If you don’t know what to look for, reading this book for the first time may seem overwhelming.

Much of the book is organized into case studies where a patient comes to Cayce for a diagnosis. Cayce provides a curse for a particular disease and elaborates on why it occurred. Some of these studies were intriguing.

Length

Chapters are relatively long, and the book runs around three-hundred pages in a fine print.

Information

The ideas in this book may come off as far-fetched to some readers—but in general, Cayce had some wise advice, particularly with health and spiritual outlook. The many people cured through Cayce are scientifically documented, suggesting there is a method to his madness.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet has an abundant amount of detail across a wide variety of topics. Any open-minded reader would value the wisdom within this novel, able to apply it to his or her own life.

The case studies are straight forward and enjoyable, ranging from cancer patients to migraine victims and paralysis. Cayce also mentions topics like Atlantis, geological upheaval of the planet, and spiritual concepts. Stearn did an excellent job portraying Cayce’s information.

The Bad

This novel isn’t for everyone and requires an open mind. The prose can be difficult to understand sometimes, and you can easily get overwhelmed in all the information. As an aid, I highlighted specific portions of the book that I could reference later.

The Ugly

This book was written in the mid-twentieth century, so some of the information may be outdated or obsolete.

—My rating for Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet: 4/5 stars: an excellent read—

Jess Stearn produced a fantastic book on the mystic, Edgar Cayce. For me, several of the topics hit home, and I found most of the book very enjoyable and informative. Much of what Cayce suggested can still be applied today, empowering readers’ lives with his cryptic words.

As I mentioned above, parts of the book are dry and serve as filler content. It is highly recommended that you underline or highlight specific passages and later—after finishing the book—use it as a reference guide.

Overall, if you’re an open-minded reader with an interest in alternative medicine and new age theories, then this book is for you.


Have you any thoughts on Edgar Cayce? Are you a Cayce fan who has researched his work? Leave it in the comments below. As always, thanks for reading!


Bonus: My Published Poetry!!!

My published poetry will be available starting this Monday the 29th! You can view and order the collected works here. Look for New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019: An Anthology. My pen name is Ed White.

The book is a collection of poems from like-minded authors, compiled into a beautiful collection. Many of the poems are quite beautiful to read. I get a portion of any profits, so if you’d like to support me, I’d really appreciate it! 🙂