Book Review: The Enduring Flame Trilogy

Hello, my readers, I hope you’re all doing fine during the Quarantine. I finished a fantasy series a while ago, and wanted to do a review while it was still fresh in my mind.

I did a review of the first book here. While I enjoyed the first installation very much, the rest of the series was disappointing. I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum.

Anyway, let’s dive in!

Premise

The first book of the Enduring Flame series started strong. There was plenty of worldbuilding, two heroes called on a wild adventure, whimsical magic, and horrible dangers lurking everywhere.

While the second book did a decent job elaborating on the first book, the third installation fell short. Resorting to mundane storytelling and cliche fantasy tropes, the book ruined everything that the first two books has built up.

By the end of the story, I was ready to shelf the book and forget about the series entirely.

Length

Each book is around 400 pages. Chapters can be long, but are broken down with several scene breaks that alternate between character perspectives. Personally, I enjoyed the many scene breaks, as it makes it convenient for taking breaks or stopping for the day.

Characters

The two main protagonists, Harrier and Tiercel, had a degree of charm. They acted as if they were siblings, always arguing in an amusing way. The third heroine, Shaiara, I found the most interesting, however, as her worldview is vastly different. This contrast in character perspectives added color to the worldbuilding and is one good thing that the series maintained.

Magic System

The magic is whimsical and unpredictable. This offered many fascinating scenarios throughout the book, but also created a variety of plot holes and asspulls from characters that seemed contrived. Overall, the magic system damaged the story by the end of the third book.

Conflict

The tension was steady and drove the prose well through the first two books. In the third book, the conflict became dull and tedious, though there still was an element of danger and risk.

The Good

The Enduring Flame Trilogy has excellent worldbuilding early on and sets strong tension with its initial installations. The characters are amusing and likable. Character’s magic is powerful and can lead to some jaw-dropping scenes, some which had me quivering with excitement. The antagonist has good backstory, weaving into the magical system.

The Bad

The prose is filled with excessive adverbs, fair dialog, mediocre characterisation, and a story that decays by the end of the third book. The magic system led to several plot holes and contrived scenarios that almost made me want to put the book down.

The Ugly

All three books have a lot of mundane “travel time” and inappropriate detours that take from the direction of the plot without adding to subplots or character growth. The main characters, while relatable, are sometimes snobbish or stupid—and not in a likable way.

The Enduring Flame series is a flower that wilted early in the season. Many of its fans from the first two books will be disappointed with the conclusion. All in all, the trilogy is nothing noteworthy, nor is it a piece of garbage that should never have been published. There are a few pearls within its pages, for those willing to look deep into the quest of Harrier and Tiercel.

Thank you for reading!


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Book Review: The Phoenix Unchained

 

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Hello and welcome to my latest book review. It’s been a busy month between family, work, and NaNo; that doesn’t mean I can’t offer another informative review from yours truly.

A writer friend recommended this series to me, and I decided it give it a go. Needless to say, I enjoyed the read and plan to read the following books at some point.

—The Phoenix Unchained—

Premise

The Phoenix Unchained is an immersive story with a rich amount of lore and enjoyable cast of characters. Book one includes staple mythology like dragons, goblins, mages, and unicorns. What I found most interesting was the magic system and how it weaves into the character arcs—but more on that below.

Length

The book is around 380 pages. Chapters can be long, but are broken down with several scene breaks that alternate between character perspectives. Personally, I enjoyed the many scene breaks, as it makes it convenient for taking breaks or stopping for the day.

Characters

The other week, I submitted a short story for an online Publishing company called Havok. The submission had what was called Dynamic Duos, or two characters that interact with each other (e.g. Frodo and Sam).

The two protagonists in the Phoenix Unchained strongly share this trait. One is soft-spoken and thin, the other is hot-tempered and burly. I enjoyed the character interactions and especially the dialog; it left me amused and satisfied, as any good cast should.

Magic System

The magic in the Phoenix Unchained initially comes off as generic and uninteresting. However, I was amazed at how the authors cleverly wove it into the character development for one of the protagonists. It even plays a part in the antagonist’s arc. The lore behind the magic system is deep and left me interested.

Conflict

The tension is a rollercoaster of stressful encounters to peaceful resolutions, as I expected in any fantasy thriller. What caught me by surprise was the death of a main character halfway through the book.

The monsters and demons are portrayed excellently, some at a Stephen King-grade level that left me shaken and worried for the protagonists.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

The Phoenix Unchained is a great read for fantasy buffs with its rich amount of lore, tension, amusing characters, and clever magic system.

The Bad

Despite its enjoyable dialog and immersive environment, several prose errors caught me off balance. At other times, I felt like I was reading a manuscript that wasn’t well edited. It wasn’t so much as finding a typo as it was the excessive amount of adverbs used. The POV also wasn’t as detailed as it could as been, leaving some distance between reader and character.

That said, the prose concision was poor, lacking a fine polish that you may find in another fantasy novel.

The Ugly

There is a lot of travel involved in the plot. The authors failed to include a map that would have been helpful as I read through the story. There was also no chapter index—but that’s a minor nitpick.

—My Rating for The Phoenix Unchained: 4/5 stars—

This is a solid book for anyone interested in fantasy. As long as you don’t mind lacking a world map and the plethora of adverbs—and prose concision for that matter—, then you should enjoy the story. The characters will entertain you and some scenes will leave you at the edge of your seat.

I may do another review when I get through the second book.


Thanks again for reading. Remember to hit that “follow” button below. I really appreciate the likes and comments you leave below. Cheers.

 

 

Book Review: Bridge of Birds

 

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Welcome, my readers, to another book review. This time I went for a more exotic pick, delving into Asian mythos. I figured this would help me write Tempest of the Dragon since both stories are based in East Asia.

—Bridge of Birds—

Premise

The story of Bridge of Birds is set in ancient China. The themes presented in the book include adventure, humor, and fantasy. Many of the Chinese mythoi are fascinating, and the author did a superb job weaving them into the plot.

The main character, Number Ten Ox, leaves his village to discover a cure for a disease afflicting his village. During his journey, he encounters a host of bizarre and unusual enemies throughout ancient China. Surviving assassins, ghosts, sultry concubines, and immortal dukes, Ox and his partner unearth the legacy of a fallen goddess and how to save her from damnation.

Length

The book is around 280 pages and chapters are straightforward and short; although I would have appreciated a table of contents to guide me through it. Oh well.

Characters

The characters in the story are amusing and oftentimes comical. Number Ten Ox is a youth built for strength and not so much for wits.

His adventuring partner, Master Li, is the opposite: an experienced old man with a “slight flaw in his character”. He comes off as a wizened individual who is both wise yet daring.

The side characters make brief appearances throughout the story, adding amusement in creative ways. There are a few gruesome scenes and deaths among the characters, but the overall story remains jovial.

Magic System

Bridge of Birds makes full use of Chinese mythology with its inclusion of ghosts, alchemy, ancient medicine, and other Taoist concepts like immortality. The magic system may appeal more to historical fiction buffs than fantasy fans.

Romance

The romance in the story is undeveloped and shallow, as the protagonist often jumps from one partner to the next. However, the author often incorporates elements of comedy into these engagements and I never took each romance scene too seriously.

Conflict

The tension in the story is present but lacking, offset by myraid comedy relief that lightens the story. At first, many of the obstacles faced by the protagonist seem dire, but a creative or amusing solution always result a page or two later.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Bridge of Birds has excellent comedy relief with a sense of whimsical adventure that grabs the reader. Its good balance of themes makes each chapter a fulfilling read. The characters are engaging and fit their roles well.

The Bad

The prose construction was sloppy in several areas, leading to verbose paragraphs and a dearth of descriptions in others. The protagonist’s emotions were not well internalized, as the story was told from a third-person distant narrative.

The Ugly

A few scenes had graphic detail, which was surprising for a book that wavers between jovial themes and gruesome concepts so readily.

—My rating for Bridge of Birds: 4/5 stars: a decent read—

Bridge of Birds is a pleasant book, with its lighthearted spin on a fantasy adventure. It is very entertaining with its cast of characters, themes, decent pacing, and East Asian mythology.

Parts of the story were weak from a dearth of descriptions, emotions, or character development, but the ending was very satisfying and worthwhile.

A reader looking for an amusing fantasy novel that isn’t too serious should enjoy this story.

 


Thank you again for reading and remember to hit that “follow” button below. Enjoy the fall weather! 🙂

 

 

Book Review: The Law of One

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Hello again, my faithful readers and fans. I decided to continue with the nonfiction book reviews, specifically another conspiracy, and spiritual book. This series is called The Law of One: The Ra Material. Like with Edgar Cayce, this book is filled with curious information that many would consider being fictitious or speculative. Without further ado, let’s dig in! 😛

—The Law of One—

Premise

The Law of One is filled with curious information of a philosophical nature. Topics covered include spirituality, diet, historical events, ancient architecture, and more. Much of the book is in interview format between the questioner and a being named Ra.

It gets a bit freaky when you learn that this Ra speaks through someone else, like a form of possession. This evokes feelings of both suspense, wonder, and apprehension.

Prose

The wording is relatively straightforward, but some of Ra’s answers span several paragraphs, and those can be difficult to understand. You may need to reread a section a few times to grasp it fully.

Length

The book is fairly short at around 200 pages. Interview sessions serve as chapters and can be anywhere from a page to several pages long. There are five installations in this series, each packed with esoteric messages.

Information

The information provided in this book is speculative and deep. Some of the sessions are fascinating, while others are ponderous and hard to understand. I recommend rereading the book at least a few times to fully understand what the book is trying to tell the reader.

The majority of the knowledge contained in this novel is inspiring and it expands the mind. Ra stresses virtue and moments of inner silence so that humanity may grow as spiritual beings.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

The Law of One offers some inspirational wisdom within its pages. Anyone who has studied spirituality and religion will respect what Ra offers. The books are relatively short and shouldn’t take too long to read. After finishing, these books serve as excellent reference guides on spirituality.

The Bad

Parts of the book are so deep that they are hard to comprehend for most people. One should reread the series at least twice to grasp the esoteric messages.

The Ugly

This book conveys some arcane information that readers may find disturbing or revelatory. Reader discretion is advised as this is a very subjective book.

 

—My rating for The Law of One: 4/5 stars: — an excellent, if outlandish read

The Law of One is a fascinating read for those with an open mind and a background in spirituality. It provides some helpful advice that the reader can apply in their own life. The book is also short, despite its ponderous paragraphs and wild information. Each read-through may unravel new information to the reader.

At worst, the Law of One is excellent science fiction; at best, it’s an instruction booklet on how to steer one’s life through the myriad issues that trouble humanity. All in all that makes it a worthwhile read.


Are you a Law of One fan who has researched the series? What did you think of it? Leave it in the comments below. As always, thanks for reading!


A reminder: My Published Poetry!!!

My published poetry is now available! You can view and order the collected works here. Look for New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019: An Anthology. My pen name is Ed White. The book is a collection of poems from like-minded authors, compiled into a beautiful collection. Many of the poems are quite impressive.

You can view and buy other books from ZPublishing too. Any purchases made through the above link benefit this blog. Thanks a lot. 🙂

 

Book Review: Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet

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Greetings, my readers. I decided to switch things up a bit and review a nonfiction novel. This installation is Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet by Jess Stearn. It’s a fascinating read and covers a variety of information that should appeal to a broad audience. Anyway, on with the show!

—Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet—

Premise

Edgar Cayce was an unnatural man, the book claimed, with his ability to enter a trance and procure insightful information. Upon waking, Cayce wouldn’t remember any of it, but listeners would jot down his words.

Many sick people were cured after following Cayce’s directions—and he often supplied complex or unusual ingredients for each cure. Cayce’s work also mentioned reincarnation and theories of Atlantis, delving deep into conspiracy theory and spiritual suggestion.

Prose

Unfortunately, the writing fluctuated between exciting and dull. If you don’t know what to look for, reading this book for the first time may seem overwhelming.

Much of the book is organized into case studies where a patient comes to Cayce for a diagnosis. Cayce provides a curse for a particular disease and elaborates on why it occurred. Some of these studies were intriguing.

Length

Chapters are relatively long, and the book runs around three-hundred pages in a fine print.

Information

The ideas in this book may come off as far-fetched to some readers—but in general, Cayce had some wise advice, particularly with health and spiritual outlook. The many people cured through Cayce are scientifically documented, suggesting there is a method to his madness.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet has an abundant amount of detail across a wide variety of topics. Any open-minded reader would value the wisdom within this novel, able to apply it to his or her own life.

The case studies are straight forward and enjoyable, ranging from cancer patients to migraine victims and paralysis. Cayce also mentions topics like Atlantis, geological upheaval of the planet, and spiritual concepts. Stearn did an excellent job portraying Cayce’s information.

The Bad

This novel isn’t for everyone and requires an open mind. The prose can be difficult to understand sometimes, and you can easily get overwhelmed in all the information. As an aid, I highlighted specific portions of the book that I could reference later.

The Ugly

This book was written in the mid-twentieth century, so some of the information may be outdated or obsolete.

—My rating for Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet: 4/5 stars: an excellent read—

Jess Stearn produced a fantastic book on the mystic, Edgar Cayce. For me, several of the topics hit home, and I found most of the book very enjoyable and informative. Much of what Cayce suggested can still be applied today, empowering readers’ lives with his cryptic words.

As I mentioned above, parts of the book are dry and serve as filler content. It is highly recommended that you underline or highlight specific passages and later—after finishing the book—use it as a reference guide.

Overall, if you’re an open-minded reader with an interest in alternative medicine and new age theories, then this book is for you.


Have you any thoughts on Edgar Cayce? Are you a Cayce fan who has researched his work? Leave it in the comments below. As always, thanks for reading!


Bonus: My Published Poetry!!!

My published poetry will be available starting this Monday the 29th! You can view and order the collected works here. Look for New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019: An Anthology. My pen name is Ed White.

The book is a collection of poems from like-minded authors, compiled into a beautiful collection. Many of the poems are quite beautiful to read. I get a portion of any profits, so if you’d like to support me, I’d really appreciate it! 🙂

SEO Articles, Poetry, Book Reviews, and Other Goodies

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Hello, everyone. It’s been a busy summer for me; between working on the family garden, editing my manuscript, reading,  family business, and working with beta readers—I’ve been swamped with work. I also have a prospective job at a local store starting soon—they support local writers and it could be a major stepping stone for me.

SEO Articles

And how has your summer been, my lovely readers? Long, lazy days or full schedules? If you get the time, check out my recent post on writing SEO articles. It’s a fantastic read if you’re a blogger yourself or write articles for a living. Who knows, you might pick up a tip or two that you didn’t know. 🙂

Blogging Tips

Speaking of blogging here’s a post from a fellow blogger—what to blog about for unpublished authors. It’s a nifty post and definitely worthwhile to check out.

Artwork on Patreon

I’ve been working on artwork for my book cover and original characters. My new Patreon page is in the works and will feature some cool content related to my upcoming book: Dragonsblade. Subscribe if you’d like to support me. Thanks.

Book Review: Dream Waters

I did a book review of Dream Waters, a paranormal romance novel with fantasy elements, set in the present day. The author is a local writer where I live—she writes good work, so please check out her novel. Thanks.

Poetry Publication!

Lastly, my poem was selected out of a pool of candidates for publication by ZPublishing again! I’ll have a link to the product page when it becomes available. Exciting times! 😀


That’s all for now. Stay cool in this hot weather, my readers. Cheers.

 

Book Review: Dream Waters by Erin A. Jensen

 

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Hello, everyone, I’m back with another book review—the Dream Waters series by Erin A. Jensen. I’m currently on book three of the trilogy (the author may write a fourth) and wanted to give my impressions of the story so far.

I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum. 😉

—Dream Waters—

Premise

Dream Waters is a fantasy/romance series set in the present day. The gimmick of the story revolves around worlds set in dreams, where people can turn into fantasy creatures like fairies, elves, and dragons when they sleep. Sometimes the dream world can overlap into the real world.

There isn’t much action, and the worldbuilding is more on the mild side. Instead, the story focuses more on dialog and character interaction.

Length

The word counts for the first two novels are around 400-500. Chapters are usually short and keep the prose moving.

Characters

Jensen does an excellent job with her characters, and the exchanges are very amusing, pushing the prose forward through humor and drama. The main characters are easy to connect with, as the story uses a first-person multiple POV scheme. Each character’s POV sounds unique and breaths life into the chapters.

The antagonist is compelling and acts more like an anti-hero who works with the protagonist, albeit the two are also romance rivals for the same woman. It isn’t until later that the real villain reveals himself.

Magic System

Dream Waters uses a fickle and whimsical magic system in the dream world that isn’t explained much. The author could have fleshed it out more to create story depth and intrigue for the reader.

Romance

The story is loaded with romance scenes, some of them rather graphic and very promiscuous. Dream Waters uses this heavily to create romantic tension between the protagonist and his love.

Conflict

Dream Waters sets our protagonist against romantic conflict and the paranormal reality of the dream world. He meets strange, fickle creatures with a diverse set of magical ability. Only by mastering his own skills in his dream world does he have a chance to save his love.

The diverse tension keeps the reader interested and set steady pacing with the short chapters.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Dream Waters demonstrates an exciting combination of fantasy, romance, and paranormal concepts I’ve rarely seen elsewhere. It has solid pacing and excellent dialog. Any lover of romance or fantasy will enjoy this book.

The main characters are well written and provide fascinating story arcs.

The Bad

The descriptions of characters, places, and emotions leave room for improvement in certain scenes. The emotional details are cliche at times and without much diversity.

The Ugly

When descriptions kick into overdrive, Dream Waters has heavy use of profanity and graphic details, which may turn some readers off.

—My rating for Dream Waters: 3.7/5 stars: a worthwhile read—

Dream Waters has a special place in the romance and fantasy genre. The unique combination of tropes and characters makes for an entertaining novel that keeps the reader turning pages and moving the story along.

The story excels in certain areas, while it lacks in others; and the prose isn’t the best. The use of graphic scenes might turn some readers off. Additional details on the magic and dream world systems would have strengthened the world-building aspects.

Overall, if you’re a reader who loves amusing characters, fantasy tropes, fluid dialog, and deep romance scenes, then Dream Waters will be an excellent choice.


Have you any thoughts on Dream Waters? Leave it in the comments below. Thanks for reading and have a great July 4th! 🙂

Book Review: Eragon book 1, Inheritance

 

 

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Greetings and welcome back to yet another book review that I’d love to share with you all! 😀 I recently returned to the Eragon series to enjoy Christopher Paolini’s writing. Eragon is a fantasy epic series spanning several books.  This review will focus on the first book, and I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum.

Eragon, book 1: Inheritance

Premise

Inheritance is a big book at around 600 to 700 pages. The plot focuses heavily on worldbuilding and adventure. There are some great fight scenes and a subtle flair of romance—although this is more apparent in book two: Eldest.

Describing Inheritance in a few words, I would say—adventure, travel, and whimsical. The plot feels very unique, although it builds off traditional fantasy tropes such as elves, dragons, and dwarves (nothing wrong there).

Characters

Sadly, there aren’t many main characters in Paolini’s first book. Eragon is the young hero who finds his mentor, Brom, and a dragon hatchling named Saphira. They travel together, meeting a few characters along the way, but the overall cast feels small and lacking.

On a brighter note, the dialog and pacing within the story are excellent and some of the best I’ve ever seen. Paolini’s books are easy to read and have a fantastic immersion factor.

The main villain, a mad king named Galbatorix, you only hear about remotely, and he comes off as your traditional psychopathic villain. That may seem cliché, but Paolini presents the mad king in a charming and workable manner. Galbatorix also has lore that helps explain his past.

Magic System

The magic in the Eragon series is whimsical and fantastic, producing everything from fireballs to flight and object manifestation. It’s a soft magic system as has few rules others than the practitioner being gifted and trained in the arts.

I was surprised how quickly Eragon acquired magical techniques from Brom; then again, Eragon is the main character, so I let it slide.

Romance

Inheritance has very little romance, but it sets the stage for Eragon’s love interest in book two. Paolini did a better job at it with his second book, and it shows progression in his writing ability. Keep in mind he wrote book one when he was seventeen.

Conflict

The tension in Inheritance is predictable yet entertaining. It illustrates the timely fantasy battles you’d expect with orcs, elves, dwarves, and other creatures. At times the conflict felt drawn out or lacking, but overall it’s enough to keep the reader at the edge of the seat.

Overall Summary

The Good

Inheritance has incredible pacing and detailed dialog in a convincing fantasy world. You’re guaranteed to immerse yourself in this unique, whimsical land filled with dragons, magical swords, and evil kings.

The main characters are well written and suit their roles well, establishing a fantasy epic that ages well into later books. The reading is fluid and dynamic while challenging readers on occasion.

The Bad

Although the characters are excellent, there are only a few of them, and the cast feels small and compact. At times the premise and tension slogged or felt linear, reduced to nothing but traveling with little plot.

The Ugly

Inheritance feels linear and could have used more characters and subplots to enrich its premise. Fortunately, the second book does it all, and more—once I get to a review of that novel.

My rating for Inheritance: 4/5 stars—good

Inheritance isn’t a perfect book and suffers from a dearth of main characters and plot depth. Yet it has a beautiful, simplistic design that just works. In particular, the magic system is enjoyable to read about, and the ancient language shows immense worldbuilding that Paolini emphasizes in his later novels.

If anything, Inheritance is the stepping stone that introduces readers to the world of AlagaĂ«sia. If you’re a fan of fantasy, I would certainly recommend this book—but then continue on into the second novel to get a better idea of the series. Eldest fleshes Paolini’s world out in ways that Inheritance never did.

Thank you for reading. Have you any thoughts on Inheritance or the Eragon series? Leave it in the comments below. Love and gratitude to all my readers. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review: The Faded Sun Trilogy

 

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Hello again, my lovely readers. Spring is in full swing, and I have another book review to share. A writing colleague recommended the series The Faded Sun by C. J. Cherryh. It’s a science fantasy three-book series. I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum for any interested readers. 🙂

The Faded Sun Trilogy

Premise

The Faded Sun series is a sci-fi story with subtle elements of fantasy in the background. Each book is average length—around 250 pages.

If I could explain The Faded Sun in a few words, it would be—sci-fi, desert, and culture. The premise reminded me of Dune by Frank Herbert, with the desert setting, science fiction elements, and how one of the characters becomes indoctrinated into a desert tribe.

While the idea beyond the book didn’t feel completely original, Cherryh put her unique spin on it with the sheer depth and description of alien races and their ethics.

Characters

There are two main characters: Niun, a young mri (one of the alien races in the desert worlds) and arrogant desert tribesman, who struggles to find his place among his people; and Duncan, another youthful human soldier, who becomes attached to the mri, eventually joining the desert tribes.

The dialog exchanges between the main characters felt dry at times and difficult to follow. There were a few excellently written spots, of course, which invested me, emotionally in Niun and Duncan.

One of the best facets of The Faded Sun is the relationship between Niun and Duncan, how it evolves over the course of three books. They begin as enemies in book one, distrustful of each other. By book three, they are bonded through kinship as brothers.

The villains were a lawful alien species called regul, who viewed the mri as a threat and wanted to wipe them out. That said, there was no fixed antagonist, rather, it was a faction of regul that changed from book to book. Because of this, I had trouble bonding (as a reader does to a villain) to the antagonist group.

Magic System

There wasn’t any magical system in The Faded Sun. I honestly felt a little disappointed, as this was listed as a science fantasy book. I suppose you have to expect that in a purer breed of sci-fi. I wrote a guest post on science fantasy and magical systems, if you’d like to check them out.

Romance

Again, being a strict sci-fi book, The Faded Sun did not include any romantic elements. Although there was a strong brother-to-brother relationship between Niun and Duncan, which I found to be adorable and well-written.

Conflict

This is where The Faded Sun shines. Chapters are filled with tension-inducing paragraphs, and Cherryh finds clever ways to challenge her characters; in particular, Duncan’s ordeals when he goes from human to mri are rife with conflict—and an interesting illustration of how adaptive and resilient humans can be.

Overall Summary

The Good

The relationship between the main characters, the conflict, and the sheer depth of alien culture presented in this book are the best aspects of The Faded Sun. This set the proper tone for a sci-fi trilogy—and it was, in some ways, philosophical.

The Bad

The dialog exchanges were usually dry, too long, or lacked sufficient emotion from the characters. Other segments of the trilogy felt like filler without much going on—parts that could have been removed or rewritten for better effect. The prose was okay, but I caught a handful of typos—and the pacing was mediocre. The antagonists also felt ambiguous and were hard to “love to hate”.

The Ugly

Parts of The Faded Sun read vaguely similar to Dune, and the side characters lacked sufficient background or emotion for the reader to sympathize. I would have also liked a more unique and fully explained technological system, rather than “generic” or “taken for granted” sci-fi technology.

My rating for the trilogy: 3/5 stars—average

The Faded Sun isn’t anything special, but if you’re a writer or sci-fi geek, you will enjoy the explanation behind the mri and regul culture. It personally gave me some ideas for my own alien races, and how to convey them to the reader. I would recommend this book for that facet alone; just don’t expect amazing dialog or characterization.

Thank you all for reading. Have you read The Faded Sun? I would love to hear your opinion on it in the comments below. Love and gratitude to my readers. 😀


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