Essentials for SEO Article Writers

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This is a revised article of an older version on this forum. Additional and updated material should provide a better guide to SEO articles.  As always, any suggestions or feedback is appreciated.

Regardless, this article is for those who have some idea about blogging and digital articles.

Introduction to SEO Articles

Articles are attractive specimens for the presentation of information. In our age of information, the internet is rife with these nifty critters. Surprisingly, few fully understand it, but I will address that here.

While the method of writing an article is solely up to the author, there are some guidelines to understand. These pointers should improve searchability and make the lives of both reader and writer convenient.

SEO Articles—What Are They?

The Definition of SEO

SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization. It is a convenient and lucrative way for a brand to advertise itself. Usually, through search engines like Google, Yahoo, Bing, or Duckduckgo, an article with good SEO will appear higher on the listings.

This feature encourages viewers to visit the article’s page. As a result, the page gets higher views and ratings. With increased scores, search engines rank the page higher, leading to more visits.

In other words, the SEO is like the pitch given to the search engine. Better pitches get better hits. Here is an idea:

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Types of SEO Pages

There are many types of web pages with SEO. Here are some to consider:

  • Product review pages: designed for the retail of goods and services
  • Blog posts (like this one): a flexible—and popular—way to engage an audience
  • News articles: essentially a digital newspaper or magazine
  • Guides and pointers: instructions on ‘how to’ something
  • Vlogs: pages that—unlike blogs—focus more on video and visual presentation; text transcripts work in this scenario
  • Glossaries: lists or dictionaries that viewers can reference

How to Write SEO Articles

Preparation for SEO Writing

Before you write that excellent SEO article, you must plan out what you intend to publish to the world. Ask yourself the following:

  • What idea is worth pitching?
  • What is the objective of this article? What are the keywords?
  • How does one present said idea efficiently?
  • What type of audience should the article target?
  • How long should the article be?

Define Your Goals

Keep it simple, but detailed enough that it satisfies what readers need. For example, on a product review page, the prose should be alluring and informative. Use supplementary blogs and pages to add to your testimony.

Google, in particular, ranks articles higher if other blogs and pages link to it. This suggests trust. If you link to one person’s blog, they—or someone else—may return the favor. Forming a web of digital blogging networks is an excellent start.

Keywords and key phrases

Identify what your article is about with a few core words. Let this be the crux of the article, what drives it. Include it in the title, intro paragraph, and ending paragraph. Distribute the keywords throughout the section in an informative way.

Do not go overboard. This may seem sloppy and unappealing (the keywords should be around .5% to 1.5% of the words, for most articles). This will boost the quality of your SEO and attract more readers.

Develop a spreadsheet first, detailing the data about keywords and potential competition. A simple Excel or Google spreadsheet works well enough. You can also use AdWord to help with the analytics of it all.

Remember, research, double check, and research again. The level of research you pour into an article will illustrate itself through length, clarity, uniqueness, and readability. Perfection is an impossibility, of course, but it is a solid ambition.

Audience

It is essential to know your viewer base before article construction. Different age and ethnic groups react differently to content. Research can help you identify the right audience group.

Depending on your reader base, the prose and complexity of the article should scale appropriately. For example, younger viewers prefer faster, more visual content. Older readers may prefer a more traditional or slower presentation.

If you’re writing for a very generalized audience and are unsure, use the average reading level for the country (around 8th grade). Here is an excellent program you can ‘copypasta’ your work into for analysis. It is also suitable for word counting and frequency— a fantastic SEO writing tool.

Headers

On that note of selecting an audience, there are ways to improve readability. For starters, master the usage of headers. Headers come with tags H1 through H6. H1 is the largest and most important. Use the header tags as you would a filing cabinet.

Here is an example:

H1 Header {the title}

->H2 Header {main section of the article}

—>H3 Header {minor section}

—>H3 Header {minor section}

->H2 Header {main section of the article}

—>H3 Header {minor section}

—>H3 Header {minor section}

Notice how the headers nest within each other in an organized manner. The H1 header contains the H2 and H3 sections—the H2 only the H3. An organized routine like this can greatly improve readability in an article.

Headers are also an opportunity to insert keywords into your article, for the sake of SEO. Search engines rank keywords in headers higher than in paragraphs. Headers summarize and offer hints to what a paragraph contains.

The words in a header should be unique and tailored towards the article’s objectives (which you hopefully outlined enough, before writing). If not, do not worry, it will come with practice and dedication.

Scale, Intro, and Outro Paragraphs

Most articles drift between 500 and 3000 words. Items longer than this some people won’t have the time to read. Instead, they will examine the first and last few paragraphs to get a general synopsis of the article.

Search engines tend to favor articles around the 1500 to 2000 word count. This implies abundance and value. Determine what word density is best for your blogging or company needs. Some writers do better on less.

Limit your paragraphs to three lines or less, if possible. The average attention span is low for readers in our busy modern society. Most readers prefer to get to the juicy tidbits of the article, rather than slog through paragraphs.

Highlight Important Points

It helps to highlight vital pieces in an article. Highlighting with headers, italics, or bold can help skimmers detect the juicy information in your article. Keywords also help, as some readers may use a find tool to locate a specific vocabulary.

This practice provides the reader with more flexibility, as those who are pressed for time can extract crucial parts readily, while others can choose to read the whole document at their leisure.

Catchy title

This should be a no-brainer for most writers. The title should be unique, snagging the reader’s interest, while not long enough to sound daunting. The title should match the information you present, giving the reader a snapshot of what to expect.

Make it a point to remember this point, as people absorb scientific articles differently than subjective ones. A simple blog update versus a lengthy report is like comparing apples and oranges. They will each attract their own unique viewer base.

Lists and bullet points

Readers love organized records, and bullet points should improve SEO.  Lists are easier to comprehend and take less time to digest. Make sure your listings are informative and straightforward. Your readers will appreciate it.

When you construct a list, capitalize only the first letter in a list item. Forgo periods at the end of the sentence, unless the listing is lengthy. Keep it short and sweet. If you find another method that works better, great, keep at it.

Coffee

Last, but not least, be sure to have that cup of coffee ready. I’m joking, of course (well maybe), but you should make whichever adjustments you feel necessary for a working environment.

Some people function better in an organized office, for example. Others find that classical music helps focus—whatever gets you going.

Conclusion

SEO articles are a curious breed of digital beasts. While difficult to understand at first, they can significantly improve the hits an article receives—this is no guarantee, of course. Persistence is important.

Becoming adept at SEO content takes time. Be patient with yourself. Take breaks from writing if you need to (I’ve done all-nighters before so I can relate). SEO articles are still a relatively new phenomenon in our digital age.

Regardless, learning the basics of SEO is essential to any digital writer. I hope this humble blog post has shown the significance of SEO—how to get started. For more information, visit the hyperlinks below.

And don’t forget the coffee. You’ll need it. 😉

Thank you for reading and good luck.

Love and gratitude to my viewers—click that follow button if you want updates. Thanks. 🙂

Additional SEO Writing Sources

SEO Copywriting and Search Engine Optimization

SEO for Dummies

SEO Beginner’s Guide

Secrets to Professional SEO Writing

Additional SEO Software Tools:

BuzzSumo—quick searches on a keyword for relevant social media threads

Moz—another keyword research tool

SEMrush—keyword rankings; fast and easy to use

WordCounter—keyword density, word counting, and more

Grammarly—grammar, readability, and overall sentence structure

 

A quick look at en dashes, em dashes, and hyphens

dashes

 

Hey, welcome back for another installation in my writing advice articles. 😎

As an amateur writer, I often wondered how dashes and hyphens functioned. At first, I assumed they joined words together. It wasn’t until I delved into the matter that I realized there are multiple variants of these critters, each with a specialized function in writing. Let’s take a look at each in turn.

Hyphens

The function of hyphens is to connect two or more words that are related, usually pairs that work as one word; e.g., two-headed, half-human, semi-conscious, long-term, up-to-date, free-for-all.

The hyphen serves as the glue that welds the pairing vocabulary, forming a compound phrase. This works for nouns, verbs, and adjectives. You can also use hyphens to punctuate character stuttering.

Never use a hyphen in place of an en dash or em dash. We’ll discuss that more below. Be on the lookout for closed or open compounds, as these do not need a hyphen.

Hyphen Examples

Closed: typewriter, skyscraper, notebook, fireman.

Open: lounge chair, living room, real estate.

Quite often a compound modifier is hyphenated if it comes before a noun it modifies, but not after.  The reason is for added clarity on what’s being modified. For example:

Incorrect: Let’s head to that run down church.

Correct: Let’s head to that run-down church.

Other examples for hyphen usage are:

  • With the vocabulary low/highlow-income, high-interest.
  • With fractions: one-third, one-half, one-tenth.
  • With prefixes ex, self, all: ex-wife, self-employed, all-powerful.
  • With numbers: second-century, third-floor, thirty-minute, ninety-four, fifty-one, one hundred and fifty-five.

Mastering hyphens can be tricky. I encourage my readers to check out that Grammarly article I linked above for more examples on when to use this symbol.

En dash

An en dash(–) is longer than a hyphen(-), but shorter than an em dash(—). While simpler than hyphens, en dashes find less use in modern writing.

The function of this critter is to establish a range, whether by numbers, distance, or parties of a spectrum such as in a versus debate or business partnership.

En Dash Examples

  • Number range: 1050 hours, 30006000 days, 15–30 people.
  • Distance range: ChicagoNew York flight, EarthMoon voyage.
  • Opposing parties: ClintonGore debate, RightLeft convention.
  • Partnership: RalphHeath Company, JonesMary Inc.

Em dash

Here’s where the fun starts. An em dash(—) is a versatile symbol. This tool separates phrases and clauses in a sentence. They are similar to commas, parenthesis, and semicolons.

Em dashes symbolize a pause in a thoughtlike I did here—, perhaps informally, while parenthesis is more formal. You could take a regular sentence and insert a pair of em dashes somewhere betwixt as in the sentence above.

Otherwise, for a single break, use only one em dash—to avoid confusion of course. Em dashes can also substitute for colonsor used in a list.

Em Dash Examples

  • An em dash is a break in written thoughtuseful for fixing incomplete sentences.
  • Two em dashes are an insertion for additional information that could be—depending on the writer’s situationexcluded.
  • An em dash can be substituted for a comma, colon, semicolon, parenthesis, bullet point, and much more.

Again, I advise my readers to check out the hyperlinked articles above for more examples. Em dashesat firstseem confusing, but once mastered, the versatility of this tool cannot be underestimated.

Personally, I enjoy using it a lot more than I did a few years ago. That said, using more than two em dashesfor the sake of clarityin a sentence is not recommended. Some people represent em dashes with spaces, others with three hyphens joined. Whatever method you use, be sure to let the reader know.

Thank you for reading, and I hope this article helped with whatever creative projects you harbor. Love and gratitude. 😀


Want to stay in touch with the blog’s updates and other nifty tidbits? Hit that follow button below. Thanks!

 

Editing and revising: concision, precision, and other goodies

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Yay for Snoopy—I mean, hey, welcome back. It’s been a while, but I’ve got another post to share. 😎

This article is a revisit on improving conciseness in prose, or rather, an updated variant of it (I mentioned it briefly in one of my earlier posts).

Concision work typically comes after the initial draft during the editing passes, so don’t worry about it too much when you draft the story.

What is Concision in Prose?

Definition

Conciseness and precision are essential to good prose. Minimizing words used, trading weak vocabulary for a single stronger word, eliminating redundancy; these are but a few of the processes involved with concision.

Why Bother with Concision?

Not only will a manuscript read smoother and faster (your readers will thank you), entire pages may animate in unimaginable ways.

Fortunately, there are a handful of nifty techniques to help. Although the result may not be crispy clean, you can bet a lot of unnecessary and nasty vocabulary are gone.

“A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts.” ~The Elements of Style, by Strunk and White

That said, we’re all human beings, so perfection is only an ambition that drives our efforts (and I doubt this article is optimized). Anyway, let’s cover some of those concision techniques.

Techniques

Wordiness

When editing your work, look for ways to shorten a phrase or set of vocabulary. Sometimes you can convert a few words into a single one. Examples of this include, but are not limited to:

  • a number of → many/some
  • at the present time → now/at present
  • despite the fact that → although
  • on a daily basis → daily
  • he was going → he went (passive voice correction)

Notice how a single word or two can substitute for a whole phrase. Passive Voice (which I covered here) always violates the concision of prose, but there are exceptions for this. I encourage you to examine the hyperlink for more information.

Invisible words

Certain words appear ‘invisible’ to the reader’s eye. Words such as ‘said,’ ‘the,’ or ‘and’ are fillers that won’t particularly grab the reader’s attention. Their purpose is to bridge the gap between words that do matter.

Regardless, if used in excess, they can cause friction in the rhythm of prose. Mix up the frequency or remove them entirely.

These tools can hold significance in dialogue when using tags to denote the speaker. Sometimes you can get away with no labels at all for ideal concision.

Descriptors and Pacing

While there are invisible words and prose symbols that serve some purpose, sometimes a writer can use a stronger one to enhance a sentence.

You can trim down excess adverbs and adjectives into shorter, stronger versions. Often this involves a little ingenuity to mold the phrases to the tense of your written piece. Consider these scenarios:

He ran to the store quickly. → He sprinted to the store.

Marle cried loudly. → Marle bawled.

The Kraken roared ferociously. → The Kraken screeched.

He was very tired. → He was exhausted.

The use of a stronger descriptor can better highlight the action or details. Sometimes a writer will ignore this rule to highlight a particular phrase or slow the story’s tempo. It’s up to you to decide how and when to manipulate pace for the reader’s benefit.

Long paragraphs slow the pace of writing and may come off as daunting to a reader (like this one—eep!). While seldom large sections serve a function, overuse forces slower prose tempo and gives writing an unfavorable taste. Action paragraphs need to be quick and to the point. Short sentences add to the jarring sensation of battle, increasing the depth of the reader’s experience.

Descriptive paragraphs are longer, slower, and more robust, similar to how human perception slows when we study or observe. Not surprisingly, scientific papers are often sluggish and detailed.

Redundant words

With concision and precision, a writer can delete an entire word without substitution, thereby strengthening a sentence or phrase. Some words are unnecessary, and you’re better off excluding them. Here are a few to watch out for:

Irregardless, obviously, very, almost, just, essentially, basically, totally, seriously, honestly, and actually.

Naturally, in dialogue, there are exceptions. Reread a sentence a few times and feel out the flavor of the words. Take your time with it and savor every morsel. Writers sometimes use these words in clever ways to better demonstrate a character’s speech habits.

Contractions in dialogue are another easy way to sharpen your manuscript, so don’t feel afraid to use them.

From my experience, contractions rarely appear in narration for a more formal tone. Some characters may purposely speak without contractions for that flair of formality. Again, it’s up to the writer to decide how to present it.

Conclusion

Writing with concision is essential to good prose. It allows for a smoother and more readable script. There are some techniques to help with the process, such as reducing redundant or wordy vocabulary, shortening paragraphs, and using stronger verbs.

Thank you for reading, and I hope this article helped with whatever creative projects you harbor. Love and gratitude. 😀


Want to stay in touch with the blog’s updates and other nifty tidbits? Hit that follow button below. Thanks!

Here’s a bonus: www.wordcounter.net. This website is a nifty piece of software you can use to sharpen your prose. Have fun!

 

Passive voice in written work

The dreaded passive voice (PV) is oft the bane of writers, especially those just starting out. PV has a crude and redundant place in writing, yet there are times when it is okay to use it. This brief article will elaborate on the nature of this litany device and how best to evoke PV to one’s benefit.

What is PV?

PA is when you make the object of an action into a subject in a sentence. The actor isn’t doing the activity, or doesn’t seem like it is; instead, the object (like a road) seems to be doing the work. See below for example:

The man crossed the trail (non-passive). The trail was crossed by the man. (passive).

The dragon destroyed the town (non-passive). The town was being destroyed by the dragon (passive).

Positioning the actor before the action associates the actor with that activity. The second sentence is more vague with the actor at the very end. Look for to be with a past participle, and ask yourself if the phrase describes an activity and who is the actor. Examples of word groups to watch out for: to be, are being, was being, was doing, is being, has been.

In contrast, active voice (AV) bring a crisper, shorter variant of prose. It caters to the reader, bringing more quality over quantity. Ask yourself this: would you prefer ten rotten apples or two ripe ones?

Here and here are more examples of PV and how to address them. Doing so often improves the conciseness of prose as well as readability. There are–of course–exceptions to the rule, and learning when a to be word group works may come with experience, as the below section illustrates.

When to use PV

There are times when PV is fine in prose. When you want to focus on the action instead of the actor, PV is the technique of choice, although it may diminish readability. Other times when PV is okay:

  1. The actor is anonymous
  2. The actor is unimportant
  3. Intended generalization

Character dialogue often uses PV and AV. Ask yourself how a character speaks. If an actor talks strange, but it’s in-character, then it’s okay. Usually–in our everyday lives–we speak with a passive voice. This method takes longer, allowing our minds to enjoy conversation and prepare our next sentence. However, in prose, a reader absorbs words much faster, therefore written PV is harder to digest.

Personal thoughts

I’ve seen PV used mainly in scientific works, like a thesis, research project, or business report. In these situations, it is generally accepted to defer to PV for a longer, more monotone and bureaucratic flair. For fiction, you’re better off staying away from PV if possible, except of course for the situations above.

Still, I’ve seen bestsellers with PV usage, so abusing this litany tool isn’t the worse sin a writer can commit. Lastly, don’t worry about PV for your first or second draft. Fixing prose is for the editing and proofing passes, much later on. Direct all your energy towards that creative muse.

Thank you for reading! I’d love to hear any feedback or questions you have in the comments below. Love and gratitude. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Guest Post] Spirituality and Magic in Sci-Fi and Fantasy

Gods and magic in SFF. Come on and check out this cool guest post I composed. Cheers. 🙂

Richie Billing

I’m delighted to introduce Ed White, writer of creative and visionary fiction, who’s contributing to the blog this week with an insightful post on a significant subject in SFF: spirituality and religion. Enjoy!


The Gods and Goddesses of myth, legend and fairy tale represent archetypes, real potencies and potentialities deep within the psyche, which, when allowed to flower permit us to be more fully human.

Margot Adler

In the realm of sci-fi/fantasy, gods are a curious breed. They represent something abstract—an idea or avatar beyond the reaches of mortal minds. This disconnect from the divine serves as a source of intrigue for the reader, and a subtle impetus for protagonists as they strive towards what no mortal has ever achieved.

Religion also plays a significant role in real-life. Gods and goddesses exist in every culture and region of the world, and there are hundreds of them. The power of…

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What is a Mary Sue?

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“There’s nothing more boring than a perfect heroine!”

DrosselmeyerPrincess Tutu

 

You’ve likely heard of this term before–I’m sure it’s been written about to death, but here’s my take. A Mary Sue is a female fictional character given a plethora of boons without many (or any) flaws. They come off as flat characters without much potential for growth. A Mary Sue (or Gary Stu for the male counterpart) are often author pets, and the plot or other actors may bend around the needs and wants of a Sue. A figure of this caliber is often unrealistic, as most humans are flawed, and this makes relating to a Sue or Stu difficult.  It is vital in fiction to create a character relatable to your audience. This draws readers in and generates sympathy and a sense of kinship with a fictional hero. Here is an excellent article on Mary Sue traits.

You can garner interest within a character by giving a flaw or two. It could be a personality shortcoming like a short temper or a technical inability to perform an action. Whatever it is, have your characters struggle with it throughout the plot. Give depth to your characters’ flaws and weave it into their evolution. Don’t overburden your characters with defects. Otherwise, they may come off as incompetent actors who can’t move the plot at all.

Here’s a website for testing a character for Mary Sue traits. There are many other types of tests available, but here’s the first I found on a Google search.

While it’s okay if your character has some of these Sue qualities, try to keep the amount moderate. Some authors believe that Mary Sues can have a role in a story. While this can be true for side characters, your main actors should be the most interesting ones; if a Mary Sue serves a purpose for the protagonists or the plot, then it should be fine as long as it’s done correctly.

Here are some ways to add depth to a character:

  1. Play against traditional norms. Give your protagonist a unique quality that sets them apart, but doesn’t raise them up on a pedestal.
  2. Seed secrets within secrets. Utilize thoughts or dreams to evoke intimacy within a reader.
  3. Even if your characters are incompetent, give them agency. Have them act upon the plot and move mountains, figuratively or literally.
  4. Switch narratives. Have multiples main characters each with their own perspective. This adds depth to the plot and its actors. It may even sharpen one of your conflicts.
  5. Have protagonists relate to other characters and build trust gradually. This goes with the above tip, but trust does not happen quickly, sometimes not at all. If you find your protagonist garners a lot of respect and admiration from other actors for little to no reason, you may want to reconsider.

All in all, a Mary Sue can seem subjective to some, but there are hard guidelines to follow that help an author avoid this character pitfall. Be sure to get the opinion of multiple types of readers with different perspectives to ensure your character is as it should be.

Thank you for reading. Love and gratitude to my readers! 🙂

 

Some thoughts on Spring creativity

cool_hd_spring_wallpapers

We are in mid to late Spring now, but I thought I’d share a couple thoughts I had about what this season is about.

This time of year brings new flowers and with it new ideas and modalities to life. While some see New Years as a starting point, Spring is also an excellent period to begin fresh or check on how the year has progressed. The days are longer and the weather nicer; this makes for ideal productivity and outdoor activities.

“Springtime is the land awakening. The March winds are the morning yawn.”

– a quote by Lewis Grizzard
That said, I’ve developed a few pointers that have helped with my reading/writing life, even while outdoors enjoying the sun:

  1. Take a small notepad and pencil with you, not a smartphone as that will distract you. When ideas arise (which they will) jot them down on paper for later consideration.
  2. If your book/script is your own, don’t feel afraid to make notations or underlines where you deem appropriate. This too can be a medium to incorporate ideas. Reading while outside is an ideal way to enjoy a book, especially when it engrosses you in a quiet and relaxing environment.
  3. Engross yourself in nature’s splendor. Allow the river to whisper its secrets in your ear.  Ground your fears in the bare rock of the Earth. Hear the beautiful inspiration on the wind. Absorb the sun’s intelligent rays. Be mindful of the present beauty around you and the future will magnify your productivity. A scientific study suggested that four days out in nature without electronics improved overall creativity by 50%.
  4. Practice light to moderate exercise (like a brisk walk) through a park or trail. This practice boosts creativity. Other types of exercise such as yoga also show promising results.

Thanks for reading and I wish you all a happy remainder of Spring. Much love and gratitude to my readers. ❤

 

 

 

Pantsing versus Plotting

Welcome back, my loyal readers! 🙂

Among writers, there exist two methods of drafting written pieces. One is more exploratory, while the other commands higher amounts of precision. These two routes are known as discovery/pantsing and plotting. Some writers begin a manuscript as a discovery piece, only to polish it with plotting later on. That said, both sides have pros and cons. Pantsing artists are like creative magicians, whereas plotters are organized mechanics. Regardless of which method chosen, either technique leads to a successful piece with proper dedication.

 

magician

Pantsing, the magician

Also known as discovery writing, pantsing authors enjoy greater freedom and flexibility. This technique is ad lib by nature, requiring little to no planning of a given piece beforehand. Pantsing is arguably fun and draws from an author’s imagination. Producing initial drafts with the pantsing method is quick and smooth at the cost of refinement and coherence. If you find yourself a discovery writer, flow with it and don’t worry too much about the precision of your prose in the initial incarnations.

nitori

Plotting, the mechanic

Plotting authors take time to outline their story and characters before they long-write it. While this is time-consuming at first, it sets the organized guideposts needed to direct the novelist along the journey. Coherence elevates, and generally stronger plot and characters result. If you’re an outliner, pay attention to the brainstorming phase.  The more plotting you do initially, the more comfortable the process will be later on.

 

plantgirl

Plantsing, the middle way

Regarded as a hybrid of the two, plantsing combines elements of both free creativity and loose planning to execute a written work. While it doesn’t have the wild of discovery or clearcut order of the other two methods, it mitigates the drawbacks with a semblance of balance.

 

Which method is best for me?

I honestly can’t answer that for you, since any of these techniques can work well. I find that mixing and matching plotting and pantsing works well. Regardless of what you chose, adhere to it and research how other writers implement the specific strategies for each. Plotting is more mechanical and left-brain; pantsing is more for right-brained and creative work. In the end, we’re all children to the art of writing, since there are so many ways to implement this historic art.

 

Thanks for reading!

 


 

What kind of writing do you prefer? Have you any suggestions for this article or ways I can improve my blogging? See a typo or an idea you wish to discuss? Let me know in the comments below. Thanks.

Sources

http://www.katekrake.com/forwriters/why-the-pantsing-vs-plotting-writing-process-debate-is-irrelevant/

https://allthekissing.com/2018/04/plotting-vs-pantsing-vs-plantsing/

https://shortspark.com/plotting-vs-pantsing/

Images

news.toyark.com Dark Magician from Yugioh

legion34.com Nitori Kawashiro from Touhou

pinterest.com Miscellaneous plant monster-girl

 

 

Meditation and the Writer

Writing is a complicated affair that takes many hours of study and execution to develop. Some describe writing as a tedious affair, a sweet-torture if you will, while others engross themselves in it. At times, the process stagnates, and authors turn to tips online or in books for solutions. Some novelists go for walks or trips to the store, still thinking about their next best story or article. While this does work to a point, it doesn’t complete the equation. These are external references that assist in the writing process, but there is also the internal. This step into the interior side of the coin is often less-traveled by writers, but it’s ever as important.

The external side of writing focuses on drawing from the right or artistic brain. Reading is a great way to feed information into your psyche. Still, these are both external or conscious activities. Even creative ideas are logically procured from the brain onto paper or a screen; these activities take energy, and they draw from the subconscious mind.

The subconscious or subliminal mind is where all memories and the information from the external gathers. To correctly balance out the interior and exterior minds, rest is needed; not necessarily sleep, but an interval of peaceful non-thinking. Most refer to this practice as meditation.

When a writer enters this realm, the clouds clear and the creative subconscious regenerates. It purifies old stagnant thoughts and transmutes them into lucid variants, sometimes genius in scale. The more one meditates, the stronger their Will, and the less they are distracted by social media alerts and so forth. Meditation increases the gray matter of your brain.

Tips:

Here are some tips and methods to begin this practice, if you feel so inclined:

  1. Relax – Let go of whatever your ego wants you to think. Drink deep the chalice of stillness and mindfulness. Fight against the urge to think about anything, even your story. Regulate your breathing or chant mantras to redirect your concentration. There are dozens of ways to implement meditation.
  2. Time – Between writing, reading, family obligations, and a day job, it’s especially challenging to find the time to meditate. Our busy society discourages this–yet, without time to rejuvenate the subconscious, burnout is inevitable. Block out part of your day dedicated to meditating, even if it’s only 5 minutes a day. Your subliminal brain will thank you. Some people meditate better at night when the rest of the world sleeps, others in the morning. Find an ideal time that works for you.
  3. Space – Establish a quiet area where you won’t be disturbed. Be sure it’s comfortable and dark. If you need to, ask your living mates to not enter for a designated interval. Defend this personal space from any miscellaneous disruptions, if possible.
  4. Dedication – Meditation, like writing, doesn’t come quickly. With your routine established, stick to it. Some days may feel unproductive, while others will. Work your way up to 20 or even 60 minutes a day if possible.
  5. Tools – Implements like music, essential oil fragrance, or colors can enhance meditation. Everyone is different; experiment, and find what works best.
  6. Write After Meditation – The brain enters a different state after prolonged relaxation. During this period, creativity and productivity may be at its highest. Take advantage of this episode to work on your piece or jot down notes. Many legendary writers such as Shakespeare utilized this to produce their masterpieces.

In ancient India texts, the act of writing corresponds to the fifth chakra Visudda, also known as the throat chakra. Your throat has a compact bundle of nerves at the neck. These contribute to the acceptance and expression of originality of voice. The main obstacle of the fifth chakra–which most writers struggle which–is doubt and negativity. Through meditation, confidence is restored, and the nerves purify.

The fifth chakra works with the second one at the navel, called Svadhisthana, or the sacral chakra.  This energy center controls pleasure and creativity. When the body isn’t producing sexual energy for biological reproduction, the life force goes towards the abstract, or creative ideas. Blockages in this chakra result in creative stagnation or exhaustion. Through appreciation of one’s body, mainly through healthy eating and meditation, the nerve endings restore back to their creative-inspiring state.

This is but a fragment of the information out there. Feel free to investigate the source links below. Writing bears an imprint of our soul, one that we transmute from the abstract (spirit) to the concrete (words). The physical and astral unavoidably connect, and neglecting one over the other cannot work for success. Take Shakespeare’s word for it:

“He doth entreat your grace, my noble lord,
To visit him to-morrow or next day:
He is within, with two right reverend fathers,
Divinely bent to meditation,
And in no worldly suits would he be moved
To draw him from his holy exercise.”

William Shakespeare
The Tragedy of King Richard the Third

Lastly, I recommend this book: Autobiography of a Yogi, the story of an Indian master and a writer full of unconditional love for the world.


Sources:

https://www.2knowmyself.com/subconscious_mind/conscious_mind_vs_subconscious_mind

 

https://www.copyblogger.com/writing-meditation/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3184843/

 

https://thewritelife.com/writers-meditation/

 

http://www.chakra-anatomy.com/sacral-chakra.html

 

http://www.chakra-anatomy.com/throat-chakra.html

 

https://chopra.com/articles/5-ways-to-improve-creativity-through-meditation

 

http://www.swamij.com/quotes/william-shakespeare.htm

 

http://yogamasti.com/us/the-science-of-the-chakras/

 

6 food nutrients essential to writers

A reader gave me the idea to write this article, as it is often missed by other writers and bloggers. I’ve mentioned tidbits in my past posts, but I’ll now attempt to clarify. Writing takes a fair measure of creativity and ingenuity to execute well. With experience and knowledge, great works can flow from a writer’s fingertips. However, there’s another facet to the equation: one’s health.

When we think of creativity and the ability to write, the brain first comes to mind–pun intended. The brain is a hungry organ, consuming a significant portion of nutrients hosted by the body. If inadequate supplies reach the cranium, our thinking slows, and we may lose motivation or confidence (just to name a few symptoms).

Here’s a list of nutrients that ensure our mind works at its best:

  1. Protein – The body breaks down this macronutrient into amino acids, which serve in hundreds of chemical reactions related to the brain, specifically neurotransmitters. These transmitters help parts of the brain communicate. They control your ability to focus, remember, and stay motivated. Animals products that are raised humanely and organically are good sources of protein. If you’re a vegan, leafy greens like kale and spinach combine well with almonds, walnuts, and pumpkin seeds.
  2. Fat – Oh no! I said the f-bomb–well not the swear word, but the three letter one. Please humor me for a moment. Over half the brain builds from fat globules. People who consume low-fat diets are at risk for depression, suicide, and poor creative function. We’ve been taught to view fats–particularly saturated fats–with anathema. While not all fats are created equal, the best come from organic family farms. Plant oils such as sunflower or peanut spoil easily and should be stored in dark glass containers. Good sources of fats are avocados, olive oil, hemp oil, whole raw milk (if you can stomach it), ghee, coconut oil, fish, nuts, and seeds.
  3. B vitamins – Coined the ‘happy vitamins’ since they improve your mood. You’re body/brain needs a broad spectrum of these micronutrients to function. The biggest one is B12. A dearth of B12 induces brain fog, memory issues, and depression, among other things. Source proper B12 supplements in the form of methylcobalamin, not cyanocobalamin, as the first absorbs better (since your body converts cyano into methyl anyway).
  4. Vitamin D – It’s difficult to absorb enough of this vitamin from the sun. Without D, the brain cannot develop itself properly. Choose D3 over D2, as again, with B12, D3 is closer to the organic substance our bodies utilize from the sun. Vitamin D absorbs best when taken with fat (avocados are an excellent choice).
  5. Magnesium – Even with vitamin D, sufficient fats, proteins, and B vitamins, your body requires magnesium to finish the chemical cycle. Magnesium plays a part in over 300 reactions in the body. Sufficient supply leads to increased focus, relaxation, and higher energy. Good sources of this nutrient are leafy greens, nuts, seeds, avocados, raw cacao, and meat. I personally use a magnesium chloride spray and absorb it through my skin, as the intestines poorly incorporate magnesium.
  6. Water – The brain holds a lot of water, and it takes only a slight decrease to cause memory and attention issues. Over three-fourths of the US is chronically dehydrated. Aim for half your body weight in ounces to drink daily. Like fats, not all water is equal–be sure to get a filter for your faucet and shower. Tap water clumps together, reducing its bioavailability to the body. Using magnets can help detangle the hydrogen-oxygen molecules. See the links below for more information.

This article isn’t exhaustive, as I expect there are many more to add to the list. I hope this article gave some insight into how vital self-care is for a writer (or anyone really). Feel free to research the topic further using the links below. I’d love to hear any additions you can make. Thank you for reading and good luck. 🙂


Sources:

https://bebrainfit.com/brain-nutrients/

https://healthyfocus.org/methylcobalamin-vs-cyanocobalamin/

http://www.dana.org/Cerebrum/Default.aspx?id=39412

https://jonbarron.org/article/magnetizing-water