Book Review: Bridge of Birds

 

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Welcome, my readers, to another book review. This time I went for a more exotic pick, delving into Asian mythos. I figured this would help me write Tempest of the Dragon since both stories are based in East Asia.

—Bridge of Birds—

Premise

The story of Bridge of Birds is set in ancient China. The themes presented in the book include adventure, humor, and fantasy. Many of the Chinese mythoi are fascinating, and the author did a superb job weaving them into the plot.

The main character, Number Ten Ox, leaves his village to discover a cure for a disease afflicting his village. During his journey, he encounters a host of bizarre and unusual enemies throughout ancient China. Surviving assassins, ghosts, sultry concubines, and immortal dukes, Ox and his partner unearth the legacy of a fallen goddess and how to save her from damnation.

Length

The book is around 280 pages and chapters are straightforward and short; although I would have appreciated a table of contents to guide me through it. Oh well.

Characters

The characters in the story are amusing and oftentimes comical. Number Ten Ox is a youth built for strength and not so much for wits.

His adventuring partner, Master Li, is the opposite: an experienced old man with a “slight flaw in his character”. He comes off as a wizened individual who is both wise yet daring.

The side characters make brief appearances throughout the story, adding amusement in creative ways. There are a few gruesome scenes and deaths among the characters, but the overall story remains jovial.

Magic System

Bridge of Birds makes full use of Chinese mythology with its inclusion of ghosts, alchemy, ancient medicine, and other Taoist concepts like immortality. The magic system may appeal more to historical fiction buffs than fantasy fans.

Romance

The romance in the story is undeveloped and shallow, as the protagonist often jumps from one partner to the next. However, the author often incorporates elements of comedy into these engagements and I never took each romance scene too seriously.

Conflict

The tension in the story is present but lacking, offset by myraid comedy relief that lightens the story. At first, many of the obstacles faced by the protagonist seem dire, but a creative or amusing solution always result a page or two later.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Bridge of Birds has excellent comedy relief with a sense of whimsical adventure that grabs the reader. Its good balance of themes makes each chapter a fulfilling read. The characters are engaging and fit their roles well.

The Bad

The prose construction was sloppy in several areas, leading to verbose paragraphs and a dearth of descriptions in others. The protagonist’s emotions were not well internalized, as the story was told from a third-person distant narrative.

The Ugly

A few scenes had graphic detail, which was surprising for a book that wavers between jovial themes and gruesome concepts so readily.

—My rating for Dream Waters: 4/5 stars: a decent read—

Bridge of Birds is a pleasant book, with its lighthearted spin on a fantasy adventure. It is very entertaining with its cast of characters, themes, decent pacing, and East Asian mythology.

Parts of the story were weak from a dearth of descriptions, emotions, or character development, but the ending was very satisfying and worthwhile.

A reader looking for an amusing fantasy novel that isn’t too serious should enjoy this story.

 


Thank you again for reading and remember to hit that “follow” button below. Enjoy the fall weather! 🙂

 

 

I’m not dead!

 

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Hey there, my loyal readers. No, I haven’t been hit by a bus or anything. I’ve been quite busy with work and other things at home. I also took some time to rest and heal myself—something I’ve neglected for far too long. When things settle down, I plan to get back to my blogging routine.


If you missed it, I did some poetry from my WIP, Dragonsblade. It’s called The Ballad of Atläs. The poetry details some of the events within the world of Atlas, namely with the protagonist.


Are you interested in alternative health and conspiracy theory? If so, I did a fantastic review of Edgar Cayce’s work. The book was a blast to read through with all the outlandish ideas it presented. I also did a review of the Law of One series.


How does a writer make his or her work more concise? In an article by a fellow blogger, I shared some of the most devilish words you should avoid. I followed guides like this and I shrunk my WIP from 140,000 words to 130,000 words if you would believe!


A while ago, I did a tutorial on basic map making for fantasy scenarios. The process requires only freeware digital art programs (and a little elbow grease).

For those who don’t want to mess with digital art programs, you can use an online website like Inkarnate. This website allows you to design fantasy maps free; for premium, you have access to additional features.


That’s all for now, my lovely readers. I have some amazing ideas to share with you when my writing juices start flowing again—sooner rather than later. Stay awesome. 🙂

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Ethereal Seals Front Page Redesign!

(This is a replica of my newly designed front page. It serves as a reflective essay and cataloging exercise. I talk about my WIPs, objectives of this blog, and other goodies. I hope you find this post engaging and informative. Thanks for reading.)


 

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Hello, my name is Ed White. I’m an aspiring writer and graphic designer, developing my skills for a host of writing and art projects. I’ve been a designer all my life, and I regularly strive to improve myself through the feedback of my community.

Below, I’ll discuss what projects I’m working on as well as what you can expect from this website.

—Introduction—

 My Goals

As a student of the quill and brush, I enjoy exposing myself to new media every day. These include books, movies, video games, and real-life scenarios. I’m currently working on two manuscripts:

  1. Dragonsblade—a high fantasy novel, part of a series
  2. Tempest of the Dragon—a historical fantasy novel set in ancient Japan

I’m also working on a few short stories with the writing groups in my area. I plan to publish these creative works in the future and share my stories with the world.

What You Can Expect Here

Here’s what you can find on this blog:

  • Writing tips
  • Short stories
  • Digital art
  • Rough manuscript tidbits
  • Reflective essays
  • Anything else I think of as I go along

—Book I: Dragonsblade—

Here I’ll discuss my primary writing projects, beginning with an overview of the WIP and a synopsis.

History

Dragonsblade was my first major writing project. It started as an idea between friends in high school. Over the years, the story and characters evolved into a detailed manuscript spanning several books.

About Dragonsblade

The first book is a 130,000-word manuscript. Catering to fantasy and sci-fi readers alike, this high fantasy novel incorporates a combination of creative and spiritual elements that are seen in books like Eragon and Star Wars.

Synopsis

Pepper Slyhart, a reviled—yet innocent—half-dragon in the world of Atlas, believes she’s worth more than what her gender or race suggests. She finds her dreary life shattered during a casual day with her friend and clergyman, Tarie Beyworth.

Through the will of a hermit named Razaeroth, Pepper inherits her father’s old sword. Pepper learns of a clan of druid fanatics, bent on overthrowing Atlas’ decaying empire for the sake of civilization. She vows to stop the druids and save Atlas as a knight blessed by the gods.

#fantasy #highfantasy #sciencefiction #romance #adventure #spirituality

—Book II: Tempest of the Dragon—

Tempest of the Dragon is currently an alpha manuscript and still in development. I intend to work on this book earnestly once Dragonsblade is published.

History

I have always been a fan of Japanese works—anime, manga, and historical facets of Japanese culture. Tempest of the Dragon is my creative passion using that intrigue for Japan, particularly the mythology.

About Tempest of the Dragon

Because the manuscript is unfinished, I can only give estimates about the book. I am aiming for a 100,000 to 120,000-word range. The story will cater to fantasy and historical readers. There will be hints of romance and spiritual concepts as subplots.

Synopsis

Kyosenko, a samurai outcast in Japan, discovers his destiny with a girl named Mina, a cursed Black Dragon in disguise. He vows to protect the ensorcelled girl with his life,  venturing with her across ancient Japan—to a place where Mina may find salvation for Japan. But there is another threat, an organization that wishes to capture Mina and abuse her arcane powers—the Kaji Clan.

#fantasy #romance #adventure #historicalfiction #spirituality

—Other Works I’ve Published—

America’s Emerging Poets 2018 New York & New Jersey

There are few places as attuned to language as New York and New Jersey. Two perpetually groundbreaking states, they’re home to major industries, high culture, and a level of diversity unlike anywhere in the world. Their residents speak in countless languages, but the same gritty pride rolls off every tongue, especially in poetry. And in America’s Emerging Poets 2018: New York and New Jersey, 70+ up-and-coming poets have their own chance to shine.

Covering a wide array of topics ranging from love and heartbreak, family and friendship, the inherent beauty of nature, and so much more, these young talents will amaze you. Containing one poem per poet, this anthology is a compelling introduction to the great wordsmiths of tomorrow.

#poetry #nature #family #romance

America’s Emerging Poets 2019 New York & New Jersey

In New York, history comes alive. The cascading waters of Niagara Falls and the verdant Catskill Mountains exemplify nature’s beauty, while the bustling metropolis of New York City pulsates with the hopes and dreams of eight million residents. In the Empire State, poets have the world in their hands.

And in New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019, 50 up-and-coming poets have the chance to share their own worlds. Covering a wide array of topics ranging from love and heartbreak, family and friendship, the inherent beauty of nature, and so much more, these young talents will amaze you. Containing one poem per poet, this anthology is a compelling introduction to the great wordsmiths of tomorrow.

#poetry #nature #family #romance

—Thanks for Reading—

On a final note, I would like to thank you for visiting my webpage. I hope you enjoy the content produced here. I cherish any feedback and support from my viewer base, be they comments, likes, or sharing my blog to others.

Click that follow button below to keep in touch with updates. Cheers.

Book Review: Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet

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Greetings, my readers. I decided to switch things up a bit and review a nonfiction novel. This installation is Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet by Jess Stearn. It’s a fascinating read and covers a variety of information that should appeal to a broad audience. Anyway, on with the show!

—Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet—

Premise

Edgar Cayce was an unnatural man, the book claimed, with his ability to enter a trance and procure insightful information. Upon waking, Cayce wouldn’t remember any of it, but listeners would jot down his words.

Many sick people were cured after following Cayce’s directions—and he often supplied complex or unusual ingredients for each cure. Cayce’s work also mentioned reincarnation and theories of Atlantis, delving deep into conspiracy theory and spiritual suggestion.

Prose

Unfortunately, the writing fluctuated between exciting and dull. If you don’t know what to look for, reading this book for the first time may seem overwhelming.

Much of the book is organized into case studies where a patient comes to Cayce for a diagnosis. Cayce provides a curse for a particular disease and elaborates on why it occurred. Some of these studies were intriguing.

Length

Chapters are relatively long, and the book runs around three-hundred pages in a fine print.

Information

The ideas in this book may come off as far-fetched to some readers—but in general, Cayce had some wise advice, particularly with health and spiritual outlook. The many people cured through Cayce are scientifically documented, suggesting there is a method to his madness.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet has an abundant amount of detail across a wide variety of topics. Any open-minded reader would value the wisdom within this novel, able to apply it to his or her own life.

The case studies are straight forward and enjoyable, ranging from cancer patients to migraine victims and paralysis. Cayce also mentions topics like Atlantis, geological upheaval of the planet, and spiritual concepts. Stearn did an excellent job portraying Cayce’s information.

The Bad

This novel isn’t for everyone and requires an open mind. The prose can be difficult to understand sometimes, and you can easily get overwhelmed in all the information. As an aid, I highlighted specific portions of the book that I could reference later.

The Ugly

This book was written in the mid-twentieth century, so some of the information may be outdated or obsolete.

—My rating for Edgar Cayce, the Sleeping Prophet: 4/5 stars: an excellent read—

Jess Stearn produced a fantastic book on the mystic, Edgar Cayce. For me, several of the topics hit home, and I found most of the book very enjoyable and informative. Much of what Cayce suggested can still be applied today, empowering readers’ lives with his cryptic words.

As I mentioned above, parts of the book are dry and serve as filler content. It is highly recommended that you underline or highlight specific passages and later—after finishing the book—use it as a reference guide.

Overall, if you’re an open-minded reader with an interest in alternative medicine and new age theories, then this book is for you.


Have you any thoughts on Edgar Cayce? Are you a Cayce fan who has researched his work? Leave it in the comments below. As always, thanks for reading!


Bonus: My Published Poetry!!!

My published poetry will be available starting this Monday the 29th! You can view and order the collected works here. Look for New York’s Best Emerging Poets 2019: An Anthology. My pen name is Ed White.

The book is a collection of poems from like-minded authors, compiled into a beautiful collection. Many of the poems are quite beautiful to read. I get a portion of any profits, so if you’d like to support me, I’d really appreciate it! 🙂

SEO Articles, Poetry, Book Reviews, and Other Goodies

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Hello, everyone. It’s been a busy summer for me; between working on the family garden, editing my manuscript, reading,  family business, and working with beta readers—I’ve been swamped with work. I also have a prospective job at a local store starting soon—they support local writers and it could be a major stepping stone for me.

SEO Articles

And how has your summer been, my lovely readers? Long, lazy days or full schedules? If you get the time, check out my recent post on writing SEO articles. It’s a fantastic read if you’re a blogger yourself or write articles for a living. Who knows, you might pick up a tip or two that you didn’t know. 🙂

Blogging Tips

Speaking of blogging here’s a post from a fellow blogger—what to blog about for unpublished authors. It’s a nifty post and definitely worthwhile to check out.

Artwork on Patreon

I’ve been working on artwork for my book cover and original characters. My new Patreon page is in the works and will feature some cool content related to my upcoming book: Dragonsblade. Subscribe if you’d like to support me. Thanks.

Book Review: Dream Waters

I did a book review of Dream Waters, a paranormal romance novel with fantasy elements, set in the present day. The author is a local writer where I live—she writes good work, so please check out her novel. Thanks.

Poetry Publication!

Lastly, my poem was selected out of a pool of candidates for publication by ZPublishing again! I’ll have a link to the product page when it becomes available. Exciting times! 😀


That’s all for now. Stay cool in this hot weather, my readers. Cheers.

 

Book Review: Dream Waters by Erin A. Jensen

 

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Hello, everyone, I’m back with another book review—the Dream Waters series by Erin A. Jensen. I’m currently on book three of the trilogy (the author may write a fourth) and wanted to give my impressions of the story so far.

I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum. 😉

—Dream Waters—

Premise

Dream Waters is a fantasy/romance series set in the present day. The gimmick of the story revolves around worlds set in dreams, where people can turn into fantasy creatures like fairies, elves, and dragons when they sleep. Sometimes the dream world can overlap into the real world.

There isn’t much action, and the worldbuilding is more on the mild side. Instead, the story focuses more on dialog and character interaction.

Length

The word counts for the first two novels are around 400-500. Chapters are usually short and keep the prose moving.

Characters

Jensen does an excellent job with her characters, and the exchanges are very amusing, pushing the prose forward through humor and drama. The main characters are easy to connect with, as the story uses a first-person multiple POV scheme. Each character’s POV sounds unique and breaths life into the chapters.

The antagonist is compelling and acts more like an anti-hero who works with the protagonist, albeit the two are also romance rivals for the same woman. It isn’t until later that the real villain reveals himself.

Magic System

Dream Waters uses a fickle and whimsical magic system in the dream world that isn’t explained much. The author could have fleshed it out more to create story depth and intrigue for the reader.

Romance

The story is loaded with romance scenes, some of them rather graphic and very promiscuous. Dream Waters uses this heavily to create romantic tension between the protagonist and his love.

Conflict

Dream Waters sets our protagonist against romantic conflict and the paranormal reality of the dream world. He meets strange, fickle creatures with a diverse set of magical ability. Only by mastering his own skills in his dream world does he have a chance to save his love.

The diverse tension keeps the reader interested and set steady pacing with the short chapters.

—Overall Summary—

The Good

Dream Waters demonstrates an exciting combination of fantasy, romance, and paranormal concepts I’ve rarely seen elsewhere. It has solid pacing and excellent dialog. Any lover of romance or fantasy will enjoy this book.

The main characters are well written and provide fascinating story arcs.

The Bad

The descriptions of characters, places, and emotions leave room for improvement in certain scenes. The emotional details are cliche at times and without much diversity.

The Ugly

When descriptions kick into overdrive, Dream Waters has heavy use of profanity and graphic details, which may turn some readers off.

—My rating for Dream Waters: 3.7/5 stars: a worthwhile read—

Dream Waters has a special place in the romance and fantasy genre. The unique combination of tropes and characters makes for an entertaining novel that keeps the reader turning pages and moving the story along.

The story excels in certain areas, while it lacks in others; and the prose isn’t the best. The use of graphic scenes might turn some readers off. Additional details on the magic and dream world systems would have strengthened the world-building aspects.

Overall, if you’re a reader who loves amusing characters, fantasy tropes, fluid dialog, and deep romance scenes, then Dream Waters will be an excellent choice.


Have you any thoughts on Dream Waters? Leave it in the comments below. Thanks for reading and have a great July 4th! 🙂

Book Length, Word Count, and Readability in Writing

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The length of a book can be a vital factor in its success. It may not appear to be at first, but there is a formula followed by countless writers and publishers. Depending on the target audience, genre, readability, and book type, the word count in a book can vary substantially.

That said, there are always outliers—books that have done well outside of word count brackets. If you’re a writer with questions about how long your writing should be, this article is for you.

—Book Length Guidelines—

Although there is no fixed word count, there are generally recognized guidelines depending on genre and audience.

Audience

Younger audiences have smaller attention spans and therefore cater to short, fast-paced book length. Adults are more tolerable with longer manuscripts. For example, YA (young adult) will—usually—be less than the book-length for a more mature audience.

Age group word count examples:

  • Poetry: 5 to 3k
  • Picture Book: 400 to 800
  • Play: 1k to 32k
  • Middle Grade: 25k to 40k
  • Young Adult: 50k to 80k

Genre

Book genres, of course, play an essential role in the word count of a novel.  Science fiction and fantasy works tend toward a high word count since the writer develops a fictional world from the ground up. This takes time to describe all the new rules and phenomena associated with such a fictional universe.

Historical fiction, Young Adult, Westerners, and Mysteries prefer a lower word count—of course, there are always exceptions.

Genre group examples:

  • Romance & Erotica: 40,000 to 100,000 words
  • Mystery/Thriller/Horror: 70,000 to 90,000
  • Horror: 80,000 to 100,000
  • Historical: 90,000 to 100,000
  • Sci-fi/Fanasty: 90,000 to 140,000

General Book Types

Depending on the type of book you intend to write, word count plays another significant factor. Flash fiction and short stories are, of course, brief, but powerful tales. A novella—for those who don’t know—is a compact novel, longer than flash fiction and short stories, with a fleshed out story and characters; ideal for a quick read.

Book type examples:

  • Flash Fiction: 300 to 1,500 words
  • Short Story: 1,500 to 30,000
  • Novellas: 30,000 to 50,000
  • Novels: 50,000 to 100,000

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—The Endgame—

You can have your long epic fantasy and do well with it. However, for new writers, it is best to start small and work your way up. A book-length that is simple and sweet reads best.

Legacies

Once authors have a handful of books under their belt—and a fanbase—they can gamble a little more. Agents and publishers can reference this track record, and this increases the chance the book gets published regardless of word count or even prose finesse. If you have enough avid fans who will buy the book, publishers will overlook certain shortcomings, since they know the books will rake in profits regardless.

For this reason, some authors have started small in self-publishing like Michael J. Sullivan before they hit the goldmine.

Quantity Versus Quality

Quantity alone does not a good book make.  You have to earn your manuscript, one word at a time. If a document is 150,000 words long but fills its pages with redundant vocabulary, it probably won’t read well to the eye of an agent or a casual reader.

Adverbs and excessive prose often slog writing; an attempt by the writer to look professional. As a general rule of thumb, the shorter the word/phrase is, the better. The simpler a manuscript is, the more people can read it, and the more can enjoy it.

Reading Level

The average reading level for America is around the 8th-grade mark. If the author wants a book to read smoothly among a wider audience, then a book should read close to this level. By using simpler and shorter phrases, the readability of the prose goes up.

Higher reading associates with scholarly articles and doctoral theses; that’s the point of them, to demonstrate a graduate’s intelligence. Informational articles like this one can calibrate higher; their purpose is to inform and advise. Fictional novels, especially YA and children books, are for people to enjoy and immerse themselves in an easy-to-read environment.

Word Impact

Each word in a manuscript should contribute to the book in at least one of the following ways:

  • Character progression
  • Plot development
  • Environmental immersion
  • Reader enjoyment

There are exceptions, but if you find a word that doesn’t fit one of these criteria, it can usually be removed. You don’t want to be overly descriptive either as that slogs the pacing and reduces readability.

Chapter Impact

Chapter length can also have an impact on readability and word count. Short chapters organize a book better, improve readability, and leave readers with a sense of satisfaction when they count how many sections of the book they have finished. Shorter chapters also make for good stopping points when a reader needs to put the novel down.

Longer chapters are tedious, but sometimes necessary when a section of a book demands enough information or plot progress to benefit the story and characters. In this case, scene breaks are good for breaking down long chapters.

Reader & Writer Relationship

Half of telling a story comes from the reader’s imagination; give half and let the reader form the rest. This stimulates the reader’s mind, bringing with it a sense of fulfillment.

A book is as much of a journey for the writer as it is for the reader. If you can provide that opportunity—for a reader to have fun and explore—they will flip pages nonstop and won’t care about book length.

—Conclusion—

The length of a book is up to the writer, depending on his or her goals and ambitions. Identifying core variables like the audience, genre, book type, readability, and the author’s legacy are essential to the process. Authors who have built up an impressive resume of stories can skirt the rules.

A writer must first do the research, just as a builder must first draw out blueprints for a house—and research the terrain. Each brick of a manuscript’s foundation should be carefully placed with meaning. If you do this, your house of stories will last against the elements of agents, publishers, and critics alike.

Here’s a free online program called WordCounter that not only checks the word count in a written document but also checks the reading level, reading or speaking time, and word frequency. Just paste your work into the program, and it will analyze everything for you automatically.

Thank you for reading and good luck in your writing endeavors.


If you like what you see, hit that “follow” button below. Thanks. 🙂

 

 

Fantasy Book review, Mistborn #1: The Final Empire

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Hello to my readers. Cheers to another book review. I read a fascinating series weeks ago and thought I’d share my thoughts on it. I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum.

With that said, let’s delve into Brandon Sanderson’s world of intrigue, magic, and adventure.

Mistborn, the Series

Premise

Mistborn is an epic fantasy series that spans multiple books. The story also incorporates some dark fantasy elements. Each book is long—and well worth it. Expect to invest time in each installation if you so desire.

If I could describe Mistborn in three words, it would be—gloomy, epic, and intricate. There is a strong sense of adventure too, though most of the plot takes place within a capital city. This didn’t stop Sanderson from developing detailed worldbuilding.

Characters

The main character, Vin, struggles to understand herself in a turbulent world of war, oppression, and darkness. She meets many characters in her journey, most that popped out of the page for me, the reader.

Sanderson did an excellent job with the characters. The cast came off as likable and amusing. There were a few scenes where I laughed and had to reread for the fun of it. Sanderson knows when to cut the tension with old-fashioned comedy relief—an essential element in manuscripts, by the way.

The villains were sadistic enough—and arcane enough—to warrant interest. The antagonist in book 1 is practical a god who survives decapitation, experiences immortality, and can manipulate thousands of people at will. Talk about a challenge for the protagonist!

Magic System

The magic in Mistborn is intriguing—an alchemical system where a person burns metals within the body. Each metal provides a specific power when burned. The effect is usually temporary and limited by the metal resources at hand.

Superhuman feats are common in Mistborn, so, expect some Avengers-grade thrills. The action blew me away and kept me reading. It is refreshing to see supernatural action mixed it for once rather than the usual sword or gun fighting.

My one complaint is that the action is a little confusing with all the unique terms. Brandon Sanderson could have improved on the readability during these scenes. I sometimes skimmed over the fight scenes because they weren’t easy to follow.

Romance

The romantic interest for the main OC, Vin, starts late in the book and builds up gradually. It may not read like the best romance novel—and came off a little flat to me—but it fits in well enough with the plot and characters.

Romance does play a stronger role in the second book, Well of Ascension; admittingly, Sanderson did a better job of it in the second installation.

Conflict

Mistborn is rife with conflict—another good detail of the book. I couldn’t go ten pages without feeling sympathy, pain, or anticipation. Sanderson knows how to keep the pages turning—never a dull moment.

I sometimes compared the feeling to Dragonlance—another favored series of mine.

Overall Summary

The Good

The characters, magic system, conflict, and atmosphere of the book are my favorite elements of Mistborn. It set the proper tone for a dark fantasy epic novel. I imagine I’ll be rereading it again in the future.

The Bad

The action/combat scenes were confusing, and the romance was not deep enough. I feel Sanderson could have developed these scenes more. Regardless, they weren’t terrible and never impeded the book’s flow beyond a few pages.

The Ugly

There were a few graphic scenes in Mistborn, some which made me pause (not in the wrong way, mind you). I’m all for gore and blood if it helps add dimension and immersion to a book. That said, this book isn’t nearly as extreme about it as Song of Fire and Ice (another excellent book, by the way).

Still, Mistborn isn’t for the light of heart. After all, it is a dark fantasy novel to some degree—and I still enjoyed it.

My rating: 4.5/5 stars—outstanding

Thank you all for reading. This review post was a first for me. If you have any feedback, comments, or suggestions, let me know in the reply boxes below. Love and gratitude to my readers. 🙂


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Book Review: Eragon book 1, Inheritance

 

 

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Greetings and welcome back to yet another book review that I’d love to share with you all! 😀 I recently returned to the Eragon series to enjoy Christopher Paolini’s writing. Eragon is a fantasy epic series spanning several books.  This review will focus on the first book, and I’ll keep spoilers to a minimum.

Eragon, book 1: Inheritance

Premise

Inheritance is a big book at around 600 to 700 pages. The plot focuses heavily on worldbuilding and adventure. There are some great fight scenes and a subtle flair of romance—although this is more apparent in book two: Eldest.

Describing Inheritance in a few words, I would say—adventure, travel, and whimsical. The plot feels very unique, although it builds off traditional fantasy tropes such as elves, dragons, and dwarves (nothing wrong there).

Characters

Sadly, there aren’t many main characters in Paolini’s first book. Eragon is the young hero who finds his mentor, Brom, and a dragon hatchling named Saphira. They travel together, meeting a few characters along the way, but the overall cast feels small and lacking.

On a brighter note, the dialog and pacing within the story are excellent and some of the best I’ve ever seen. Paolini’s books are easy to read and have a fantastic immersion factor.

The main villain, a mad king named Galbatorix, you only hear about remotely, and he comes off as your traditional psychopathic villain. That may seem cliché, but Paolini presents the mad king in a charming and workable manner. Galbatorix also has lore that helps explain his past.

Magic System

The magic in the Eragon series is whimsical and fantastic, producing everything from fireballs to flight and object manifestation. It’s a soft magic system as has few rules others than the practitioner being gifted and trained in the arts.

I was surprised how quickly Eragon acquired magical techniques from Brom; then again, Eragon is the main character, so I let it slide.

Romance

Inheritance has very little romance, but it sets the stage for Eragon’s love interest in book two. Paolini did a better job at it with his second book, and it shows progression in his writing ability. Keep in mind he wrote book one when he was seventeen.

Conflict

The tension in Inheritance is predictable yet entertaining. It illustrates the timely fantasy battles you’d expect with orcs, elves, dwarves, and other creatures. At times the conflict felt drawn out or lacking, but overall it’s enough to keep the reader at the edge of the seat.

Overall Summary

The Good

Inheritance has incredible pacing and detailed dialog in a convincing fantasy world. You’re guaranteed to immerse yourself in this unique, whimsical land filled with dragons, magical swords, and evil kings.

The main characters are well written and suit their roles well, establishing a fantasy epic that ages well into later books. The reading is fluid and dynamic while challenging readers on occasion.

The Bad

Although the characters are excellent, there are only a few of them, and the cast feels small and compact. At times the premise and tension slogged or felt linear, reduced to nothing but traveling with little plot.

The Ugly

Inheritance feels linear and could have used more characters and subplots to enrich its premise. Fortunately, the second book does it all, and more—once I get to a review of that novel.

My rating for Inheritance: 4/5 stars—good

Inheritance isn’t a perfect book and suffers from a dearth of main characters and plot depth. Yet it has a beautiful, simplistic design that just works. In particular, the magic system is enjoyable to read about, and the ancient language shows immense worldbuilding that Paolini emphasizes in his later novels.

If anything, Inheritance is the stepping stone that introduces readers to the world of Alagaësia. If you’re a fan of fantasy, I would certainly recommend this book—but then continue on into the second novel to get a better idea of the series. Eldest fleshes Paolini’s world out in ways that Inheritance never did.

Thank you for reading. Have you any thoughts on Inheritance or the Eragon series? Leave it in the comments below. Love and gratitude to all my readers. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry, Writing Tips, and More

tree tunnel at daytime

Hello, hello to all my readers. It’s only a week into March and it has been a busy month. I’ve worked on my beta manuscript nonstop, seeking feedback and writing, revising chapters—you know the drill. This journey has been a long one, filled with pain and joy.

If you’re interested in beta reading, check me out on betareader.io here. If the link doesn’t work, look for an ebook with a green gem on it. Betareader is a great website for beta testing longer novels.


I’ve posted some dream segments from my beta manuscript involving the main OC, Pepper Slyhart. They’re a bit poetic and romantic, as they involve her love interest, Tarie Beyworth. The antagonist is a dragon queen, seeking to control Pepper’s heart. You can check out my latest one here.


Although it’s March, it’s never too late to celebrate fantasy and science fiction. 😀 February was #Fantasymonth, and I wrote a fun piece about my interests as a fantasy reader. If you feel so inclined, you can participate in the game here.


Last, but not least, I created a simple list about writing a protagonist, building tension between character and plot, and how to bring it all together. You can check out that post here.

That’s all for now, my lovely readers. The rest of this month promises to be a productive one. In the meanwhile, stay cool and persevere in whatever your dreams are. Love and gratitude. 🙂