Writing, Book Reviews, and Reflections of the Self—a Spring Time Revelation

woman reading a book

Hello to all my lovely readers. 🙂

It’s been a steady month, working on my blog, doing book reviews, and revising my manuscript for Dragonsblade. I would like to thank all my alpha and beta readers—for all the feedback you’ve given me so far.

My WIP: Dragonsblade

Dragonsblade has progressed much in this past month alone. As I improve the story, I’m growing closer to my characters, particularly Pepper Slyhart and Tarie Beyworth. I’ve learned so much about POV depth alone—very exciting!

I’m always looking for more readers. If you’re interested, contact me via this site or check me out at www.betareader.io. My beta book cover has a big green gem on it. Thanks.

An Interesting Perspective on Writing

The other day, I ran across an article by a fellow blogger. She talks about the craft of writing and how we can use it in unique ways. I’d highly recommend checking it out here. Her blog is equally fantastic and has plenty to offer on the fundamentals for writers.

Book Review: The Faded Sun

A few weeks ago, I finished a sci-fi trilogy called The Faded Sun. I did a book review on it here if you’re curious. The books do a great job describing alien cultures, and I found the relationship between the main characters to be cute; the prose was a bit dry though, and the characterization was subpar.

I have more fantasy and sci-fi book reviews in the works. Stay tuned for more. 😛

Introductions of a Novel: Essential Tips, Tricks, and More

My article on false starts, introductions, and more contains vital information on writing the beginning of a novel. I suggest you check it out if you’re a writer. It has some nifty tips and amusing allegories.


That’s all for now, my dear readers—thanks for stopping by. I hope you’re having a lovely spring and be sure to enjoy the weather before it gets too hot. Cheers. 😀

close up of leaf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meditation, Stillness, Creativity: an artist’s revelation.

backlit beach clouds dark

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

—Meditation and Creativity—

I’ve practiced meditation for several years now. I find it to be a calming, insightful practice that stimulates creativity and it has helped with my writing and digital artwork. For more information on the practice, see this older article I wrote.

That said, I had a revelation about it quite recently that I feel is important to anyone reading this—be they a writer, artist, meditator, or an average joe.

When we ground ourselves in stillness, we draw inward and banish the noise of the outer world. In this fashion, we move to our inner universe. It’s here that nothing from the outside should penetrate this sacred place—ideally anyway.

—My Background with Meditation—

During the past few weeks, months, maybe even years—I’ve forgotten how long—my allowance for outside noise gradually increased outside my notice. It became so bad that I couldn’t focus, too anxious thinking about my projects and work. Even my sleep got messed up. I didn’t create that special place of rest and healing that I so desperately needed.

My point is when we do something like meditation or any other healing or resting ritual, we sometimes become forgetful of what that inner universe is really like. I feel so blessed to have reawakened to this notation—and I pray that, to anyone reading this, that you, too, treasure and respect your inner self.

Meditation is so beneficial to the body, but we can’t just sit down and force it to happen; it’s a natural, passive process that takes us on a journey inward.

—Tips on Practicing—

Here are some tips and methods to begin this practice, if you feel so inclined:

  1. Relax – Let go of whatever your ego wants you to think. Drink deep the chalice of stillness and mindfulness. Fight against the urge to think about anything, even your story. Regulate your breathing or chant mantras to redirect your concentration. There are dozens of ways to implement meditation.
  2. Time – Between writing, reading, family obligations, and a day job, it’s especially challenging to find the time to meditate. Our busy society discourages this–yet, without time to rejuvenate the subconscious, burnout is inevitable. Block out part of your day dedicated to meditating, even if it’s only 5 minutes a day. Your subliminal brain will thank you. Some people meditate better at night when the rest of the world sleeps, others in the morning. Find an ideal time that works for you.
  3. Space – Establish a quiet area where you won’t be disturbed. Be sure it’s comfortable and dark. If you need to, ask your living mates to not enter for a designated interval. Defend this personal space from any miscellaneous disruptions, if possible.
  4. Dedication – Meditation, like writing, doesn’t come quickly. With your routine established, stick to it. Some days may feel unproductive, while others will. Work your way up to 20 or even 60 minutes a day if possible.
  5. Tools – Implements like music, essential oil fragrance, or colors can enhance meditation. Everyone is different; experiment, and find what works best.
  6. Write After Meditation – The brain enters a different state after prolonged relaxation. During this period, creativity and productivity may be at its highest. Take advantage of this episode to work on your piece or jot down notes. Many legendary writers such as Shakespeare utilized this to produce their masterpieces.

—Some Additional Insight—

In ancient India texts, the act of writing corresponds to the fifth chakra Visudda, also known as the throat chakra. Your throat has a compact bundle of nerves at the neck. These contribute to the acceptance and expression of originality of voice. The main obstacle of the fifth chakra—which most writers struggle with—is doubt and negativity. Through meditation, confidence is restored, and the nerves purify.

The fifth chakra works with the second one at the navel, called Svadhisthana, or the sacral chakra.  This energy center controls pleasure and creativity. When the body isn’t producing sexual energy for biological reproduction, the life force goes towards the abstract, or creative ideas. Blockages in this chakra result in creative stagnation or exhaustion. Through meditation, the nerve endings restore their creative-inspiring state.

—A Spiritual Conclusion—

This is but a fragment of the information out there. Feel free to investigate the source links below. Writing bears an imprint of our soul, one that we transmute from the abstract (spirit) to the concrete (words). The physical and astral unavoidably connect, and neglecting one over the other cannot work for success.

Thank you for reading and I’ll leave you with this quote:

“He doth entreat your grace, my noble lord,
To visit him to-morrow or next day:
He is within, with two right reverend fathers,
Divinely bent to meditation,
And in no worldly suits would he be moved
To draw him from his holy exercise.”

William Shakespeare
The Tragedy of King Richard the Third

 

Poetry, Writing Tips, and More

tree tunnel at daytime

Hello, hello to all my readers. It’s only a week into March and it has been a busy month. I’ve worked on my beta manuscript nonstop, seeking feedback and writing, revising chapters—you know the drill. This journey has been a long one, filled with pain and joy.

If you’re interested in beta reading, check me out on betareader.io here. If the link doesn’t work, look for an ebook with a green gem on it. Betareader is a great website for beta testing longer novels.


I’ve posted some dream segments from my beta manuscript involving the main OC, Pepper Slyhart. They’re a bit poetic and romantic, as they involve her love interest, Tarie Beyworth. The antagonist is a dragon queen, seeking to control Pepper’s heart. You can check out my latest one here.


Although it’s March, it’s never too late to celebrate fantasy and science fiction. 😀 February was #Fantasymonth, and I wrote a fun piece about my interests as a fantasy reader. If you feel so inclined, you can participate in the game here.


Last, but not least, I created a simple list about writing a protagonist, building tension between character and plot, and how to bring it all together. You can check out that post here.

That’s all for now, my lovely readers. The rest of this month promises to be a productive one. In the meanwhile, stay cool and persevere in whatever your dreams are. Love and gratitude. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My post got deleted!

So yeah, I was about to publish a 1,000-word article on my blog here. I was fiddling with some inserted images to get them just right. Suddenly, WordPress decides to delete it. When I try to recover it in revisions, there aren’t any listed! I tried checking Google caches and using a nifty web tool called Wayback Machine. No luck.

I understand glitches can happen, WordPress, but it still burns my coffee after spending hours on my article. I’m just venting to my readers, of course. Literary expression of ire is a fine way to feel better.

That said, my—now dead—article was on constructive criticism tips for writers. I discussed some nifty advice that put things into perspective. I’m too lazy and busy to rewrite it though. I’ll post some articles below that covered the gist of it.

I’m sorry, to any of my readers, but shit like this happens sometimes. What can we do but push forward? Whew! I feel better now.

Thank you for reading my little rant. 🙂

Suggested websites for criticism

https://personalexcellence.co/blog/constructive-criticism/

https://www.themuse.com/advice/taking-constructive-criticism-like-a-champ

https://oregonstate.edu/instruct/comm440-540/criticism.htm

https://www.reference.com/art-literature/examples-constructive-criticism-95c378240583c2fc

https://www.writerscookbook.com/giving-and-receiving-constructive-criticism/

https://www.thebalancecareers.com/tips-for-an-effective-creative-writing-critique-1277065

https://www.pcwrede.com/getting-good-critique/

 

 

 

 

 

A Big WordPress Thank You—50 Follows!

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It seems I hit another milestone: 50 follows! I wanted to take the time to thank all of you wonderful people for reading my humble blog. I may not be the best writer or blogger, but it brings a smile to my face to see others delighted by my work.

That said, I also noticed my WordPress yearly subscription just renewed as I hit 50 follows. This is an excellent opportunity to recap on the year’s progress. Doing so may give insight on where this blog heads for the future—and beyond.

—WordPress Beginnings—

How I Started with WordPress

I was halfway through my alpha manuscript for Ethereal Seals when I read good things about blogging—WordPress in particular. Many writers took up blogging, not just for building followers, but also for the sake of the craft. I find it a relaxing pastime, one that brings notice to my writing project—the chance to meet wonderful people like you.

My First Year on WordPress

Not much happened with the first few years I began WordPress in 2016 and 2017. At this time, my webpage was an unpaid subscription. I focused on designing the basic framework for my webpage and connecting it to social media. I rarely posted, mostly using the page as an archive to brainstorm and test ideas rather than a blog.

—A Rough Journey—

Enter 2018

The current year, 2018, is when I posted more routinely on my blog. I had fleshed out the skeleton for Ethereal Seals and wanted to spread word about it—early.

Unfortunately, it was rare for me to get more than a few views each week. The road was rough and depressing. Some weeks I was too busy to blog, or I felt unmotivated. Many times I felt like throwing in the towel—and still do sometimes. The feedback I get from readers helps me push forward.

I kept blogging, regardless of my dismal results. With every post, my blogging skills improved. I explored WordPress more, discovering new ways to present my site. I read other bloggers’ pages and networked. Soon, I had a small niche of blogger buddies that I spoke with often.

Leveling Up

Early in 2018, my website had leveled up to a Personal WordPress page. I wanted my own domain for a reasonable cost. I also read that having a domain is like owning your own brand—it shows the world you’re serious about blogging and writing.

Months later, I found a job as a freelance writer. The occupation involved writing articles in a particular format. Some of you may have noticed that my presentation of articles has changed—for improved readability and organization. I’m still experimenting with it.

—A Nice Conclusion to the Year—

A Pleasant Surprise

Towards the end of 2018, I was between jobs, relying on my freelance writing to keep me afloat. I also found a local writers’ group in my village, a place for feedback and networking purposes. So far, I have enjoyed it, and the people there are helpful.

Meanwhile, I noticed my follower count improving on WordPress. I expected to get only 10 to 15 followers by year’s end. With your generous help, I’ve more than quadrupled my goal. Although I still have a long way to go, this is more than I could ever hope for. Thank you.

Looking Forward

I’m happy with the way this blog has turned out—its overall progression. My intent for the first couple of years was a casual blog without a lot of hassle.

I intend to improve my blogging skills and expand my outreach. This will—hopefully—garner more support for my writing project. I’m always looking for beta readers and helpers. If you’re interested, let me know.

Thank you all once again for your support, my little niche of readers. Without you, I may have given up long ago. Comments and even liked articles motivate me to blog and work on Ethereal Seals.

Final Remarks

With that said, I know the writer’s journey is arduous for anyone. I will remain patient and steadfast to my goals. My manuscript has improved significantly—and continues to with every editing pass.

As 2018 draws to a close, my objectives for 2019 are to save up enough money for an editor, find an agent, and begin the publishing process for Ethereal Seals book one. I intend to remain a blogger and attendee to the writers’ group. If things pan out, my book—or ebook if I self-publish—will be available by late 2019.

Thank you again for reading. Have a wonderful Christmas, New Years, Winter Solstice, or whatever it is you celebrate! Cheers. 😀


Hit that follow button if you want to stay connected. Love and gratitude.

 

 

 

Touching base

Hello to all my readers. I’m just touching base in this post as per my absence, and I wanted to jot down some of my thoughts and feelings for those interested.

My new job has kept me busy (6 days a week at a postal position does that). It’s not my ideal occupation, but it’s certainly a step up from my last one. I plan to save up enough money with this job to pay the bills and hire an editor for my upcoming book: Dragonsoul. The postal job is difficult, so, I’m hoping I make the probation period and become regular. Personally, I’d prefer fingering through a book or manuscript than a bundle of letters. As a CCA, the perks you get are good exercise and fresh air.

Outside of work, I’ve busied with reading science fantasy like Ender’s Game, The Dark Tower, Mistborn, and an informative book for writers called The Frugal Editor. I’d highly recommend these books for any SF writer, especially amateurs like myself.

Outside of reading and family obligations, I’ve done editing passes with Dragonsoul. It sounds better with every pass, but I always find new typos or issues to resolve. I’d say my manuscript is coming along, and I look forward to the end product. I have two other books planned for a trilogy at present. Creating fantasy worlds, especially on Atlas where Dragonsoul takes place, gives me a lot of fulfillment. No matter where this project goes, I’ll always be grateful for this chance to engineer such a beautiful world.

Anyway, that’s all for now. I’ll post a new writing article when I get the chance. Thank you for reading. Love and gratitude. 🙂


For anyone who has read my series thus far, I’d be interested in hearing feedback or if you have questions about it. If you haven’t read it, I’m always looking for more beta readers. Let me know in the comments below. Thanks. 😀